Apple Stops Signing iOS 10.3.1

Following the release of iOS 10.3.2 on May 15, Apple has stopped signing iOS 10.3.1, the previous version of iOS that was available to consumers.

Customers who have upgraded to iOS 10.3.2 will no longer be able to downgrade their devices to iOS 10.3.1.

Apple routinely stops signing older versions of software updates after new releases come out in order to encourage customers to keep their operating systems up to date.

iOS 10.3.2 is now the only version of iOS 10 that can be installed on iOS devices by the general public, but developers and public beta testers can download iOS 10.3.3, a future update that is being beta tested and could see a release in the near future.
Discuss this article in our forums

Apple buys a company making eye-tracking glasses

Apple wasn't shy about its augmented reality plans at WWDC this year, and it's backing up those goals with yet another acquisition. MacRumors has learned that Apple recently bought SensoMotoric Instruments, a German company that makes eye-tracking g…

How to Install iOS 11 Public Beta on iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch

Apple today released the first public beta of iOS 11 for eligible iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch models, allowing users who aren’t signed up for the Apple Developer Program to test the software update ahead of its official release in the fall.



iOS 11 is pre-release software, so installing the beta on a secondary device is highly recommended. Due to bugs and other potential issues, installing the iOS 11 beta on an iPhone that you use everyday is generally not a good idea.

Installing the iOS 11 public beta is a relatively simple task that, in most cases, shouldn’t take longer than 15 or 20 minutes from start to finish. Here’s the step-by-step instructions for an iPhone, which extend to the iPad and iPod touch. Continue reading “How to Install iOS 11 Public Beta on iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch”

Sony to demo 3D face biometric running on an Xperia smartphone

 If smartphone hardware rumors are on the money, and they are usually at least in the ballpark (with the exception of transparent, bendable phones; apparently forever doomed to be mocked up in Photoshop) — then a 3D depth sensor is coming to the front-facing camera of a handset near you in the not too distant future. Read More

iOS 11 preview: Full of promise, especially on bigger screens

As always, Apple spent a considerable chunk of WWDC earlier this month hyping up iOS 11 and all of the new features it brings. Now it's your turn to take them for a spin. The first public release of the iOS 11 beta goes live today for people particip…

Original iPhone’s First Four Reviewers Reminisce About Getting Their Hands on It for the First Time

With the iPhone’s tenth birthday coming up this week, CBS Sunday Morning aired a segment today taking a look back at the development and launch of the original iPhone.



The segment from David Pogue includes a roundtable session with Pogue, Walt Mossberg, Steven Levy, and Ed Baig, the four journalists who received review units of the iPhone in 2007 just prior to its launch.

“After three days,” said Mossberg, “I was ready to throw this thing out of the window for trying to type on glass.”

“It’s ten years later,” said Levy, “and half the emails I get still have a little message underneath saying, ‘Typed on phone, forgive typos’!”

Pogue also sits down for a brief interview with Bas Ording, one of the key Apple engineers behind the first iPhone.

Part of what made the iPhone a hit was that objects in that touchscreen world have their own physics. You can thank Bas Ording for some of it, like how lists have momentum when you flick them, or how they do a little bounce when you get to the end.

“And now, a billion people are using your idea,” said Pogue.

“Is it a billion? That’s a lot!” Ording laughed.

“Did anyone, at the time, on this team, have any idea how big this could be?”

“Oh, no, not at all. I didn’t, for sure.”

The segment doesn’t break any new ground on the background of the iPhone, but it’s a nice piece highlighting the milestone anniversary of the device that changed the world.
Discuss this article in our forums

Wallet-busting Galaxy Note 8 expected to launch in September

VentureBeat reported today that the upcoming Galaxy Note 8 will be Samsung's most expensive model yet. The phone is expected to retail for €999 — which should put it somewhere around $900 — and will likely launch in late September. The informa…

Griffin Launches New Survivor Cases for 10.5-Inch iPad Pro

Griffin today announced a new range of Survivor cases designed for Apple’s new 10.5-inch iPad Pro, introducing the Survivor Rugged Folio, Survivor Journey Folio, and Survivor Journey.

The Survivor Rugged Folio is the most protective case of the bunch, protecting the new iPad Pro from drops, dings, and scratches. It keeps the iPad safe from drops up to four feet with a polycarbonate exterior and flexible TPU shell that has a stain-resistant Tactical Grip cover.

It includes Griffin’s impact dispersion system for additional drop protection, and the frame includes built-in magnets that allows the iPad to be mounted on most magnetic surfaces.



Griffin’s Journey Survivor Folio is a folio-style case with front and back protection for the iPad. It is also made from a durable polycarbonate material, with a magnetic cover that can fold into a stable stand with multiple viewing and typing angles. It also protects the iPad Pro from drops up to four feet and it can be mounted on magnetic surfaces.

The Survivor Journey is Griffin’s simplest and lightest-weight case, offering protection for the rear of the iPad Pro. Like Griffin’s other cases, it can survive drops up to four feet, and it also includes magnets at the back of the case so the iPad Pro can be mounted on magnetic surfaces like refrigerators.

All three cases are available today from the Griffin website. The Survivor Journey is priced at $29.99, the Survivor Journey Folio is priced at $59.99, and the Survivor Rugged Folio is priced at $59.99.
Discuss this article in our forums