Samsung Galaxy NX review: an overpriced Android-powered mirrorless camera

Samsung Galaxy NX review: an overpriced Android-powered mirrorless camera

Samsung’s flagship interchangeable-lens camera, the NX300, is by far the company’s most impressive shooter to date. It offers stellar hybrid-autofocus capabilities, excellent image quality and integrated WiFi, and it retails for a hair over $550. For all intents and purposes, it’s a very competitive option, if not one of the best deals on the market today. It’s frustrating, then, that Samsung opted to price the Galaxy NX — an Android-powered camera based on the NX300 — at an obscene $1,700, lens included. If you’re not a deep-pocketed early adopter, it’s absolutely a dealbreaker. But I still enjoyed my two-week test with the Galaxy NX, and if you manage to overlook the MSRP, you might just fall in love.%Gallery-slideshow121859%

Filed under: Cameras, Samsung

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Source: Full-resolution sample images

Samsung Galaxy NX mirrorless camera strikes a pose for the FCC

Samsung Galaxy NX mirrorless camera strikes a pose for the FCC

It’s by no means a phone, so adjust your expectations accordingly. Samsung’s Android-infused Galaxy NX camera, revealed last week at the company’s London bonanza, has just reared its LTE-capable body at the FCC. Sporting model number EK-GN120, the portable mirrorless camera offers up no real surprises — it has all the internal trimmings Samsung already officially announced, like WiFi a/b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.0 and radios for WCDMA (850/1900MHz) and LTE (Band 5). Nothing in the filing pegs this as a US release, so the usual “(insert carrier)-friendly bands” won’t apply here. In fact, its mix of radios clearly mark this Galaxy NX for a South Korean debut. Just when that’ll be, we still don’t know. It’s currently slated for a vague summer release in the UK. On the plus side, this means you still have plenty of time to save up for what should be a hefty price tag.

Filed under: Cameras, Wireless, Samsung, Google

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Source: FCC, (2)

Fujifilm’s X-M1 interchangeable camera leaks out, doesn’t mess with retro success

Fujifilm's XM1 interchangeable camera leaks out, doesn't mess with vintage success

Fujifilm’s about to extend its line of mirrorless shooters packing manual dials and vintage looks, if a leak from Digicame Info is to be believed. The Japanese rumor site has flaunted pictures of a purported X-M1 model, which bears a strong resemblance to X-E1 we saw last year, minus the electronic viewfinder and shutter-speed selector dial. In place of the latter is a general mode selector, along with a tiltable LCD screen and WiFi, judging by the pictures above and after the break. While all that points to a cheaper model aimed at more casual shooters, there’s no word from the company about specs, pricing or a release date, obviously. As soon as we hear, of course, you’ll be the first to know.

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Source: Digicame Info (translated)

Pentax Q7 purportedly leaks with three color options, larger sensor than Q10

Pentax Q7 purportedly leaks with three color options, larger sensor than Q10

Pentax camera launches always seem to be colorful affairs, and if new images are to be believed, a multi-hued mirrorless model with a retro bent will soon arrive from the outfit. According to serial leaker Digicame-info, a new Q7 model will be unveiled with a larger 1/1.7-inch sized sensor than the 1/2.3-inch CMOS-packing Q10, and come with a kit zoom or optional standard prime lens on July 5th. Until we hear it from the source, though, it’d be wise to hold off on buying matching silver, black or yellow outfits.

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Via: Photo Rumors

Source: Digicame Info

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Micro Four Thirds camera review

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Stepping across the great DSLR divide into the land of mirrorless cameras always requires some compromise. Focusing speed, image quality, lens compatibility and battery life are frequent casualties, but for everyone except professional shooters, the size and cost benefits of swapping a full-grown beast for a compact ILC surely help soften the blow. The latest Micro Four Thirds model from Olympus, the OM-D E-M5, adds functionality that expand that list of betterments even further, allowing more versatility than larger DSLRs have to offer. These perks include a water-resistant design, for starters, along with a nifty lens that offers macro shooting and both manual- and powered-zoom in one compact package.

One area where the 16-megapixel E-M5 does match the footprint of its full-size brethren is in price: you’ll drop a cool grand for the body alone, while the 12-50mm f/3.5-6.3 lens kit will bump that tag up another $300. Make no mistake, the E-M5 is a fantastic camera, but $1,300 is mighty steep for any mirrorless model, especially one with a Micro Four Thirds sensor. This, however, is no ordinary MFT camera. As the first model in Olympus’s OM-D line — taking design cues from the company’s popular line of OM film cameras — the E-M5 is in a class of its own, at least as far as Olympus’s portfolio is concerned. Besides physical appearance, perhaps, the most notable selling point is its focus speed: press the shutter release, and your subject comes into clarity with rapid-fire precision, whether you’re shooting in bright sunlight or a dark restaurant. But though the E-M5 has already received accolades for its powerful focusing, you might be wondering how the whole package performs. Meet us past the break to find out.

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Olympus OM-D E-M5 Micro Four Thirds camera review originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 01 May 2012 12:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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