It Was Hillary Clinton’s Idea To Take The Plunge And Go On ‘Between Two Ferns’

Hillary Clinton personally pushed to make an appearance on “Between Two Ferns,” according to the director of the web series.
In an interview with The Daily Beast, director Scott Aukerman said Clinton wanted to participate because sh…

Hillary Clinton personally pushed to make an appearance on “Between Two Ferns,” according to the director of the web series.

In an interview with The Daily Beast, director Scott Aukerman said Clinton wanted to participate because she had enjoyed an episode in which President Barack Obama was a guest. Obama appeared on the show to promote healthcare.gov, and many people did in fact flock to the site after the episode aired.

The Clinton camp reached out to us and said that there was interest and what we found out later that it was actually her idea,” Ackerman said. “A lot of times with ‘Between Two Ferns’ if it’s someone in entertainment, their publicist will reach out. Or in the case of Obama, the White House reached out, and you never quite know if the person knows that their people are reaching out about it. But in this case, Mrs. Clinton is the one who reached out about doing it, as she was a big fan of the Obama one.”

Ackerman also revealed that Clinton enjoyed filming the show so much that she gave him and host Zach Galifianakis more time than they had initially been allotted. The interview was shot on Sept. 9, the same day that Clinton was diagnosed with pneumonia.

The show is built around Galifianakis asking his guests awkward questions. Past guests have included actors Natalie Portman, Brad Pitt and Steve Carell. 

If Clinton was feeling under the weather, it didn’t affect her humor. She was quick with zingers and educated Galifianakis on the double standards women face. When the host asked whether Donald Trump would wear a white power tie to the debate, Clinton quickly said “that would be more appropriate.”

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

‘Network’ Came Out 40 Years Ago And Trump Is Proof It Still Matters

The relationship we have with the media is a complicated one. We binge, hate-watch, cry, and laugh with characters familiar and unfamiliar. We equally suspend our disbelief and get all swept up in it.

Few films have summarized (and satirized) this relationship as well as the movie “Network” ― a shocking feat when you remember that the film came out in 1976.

Still, “Network” remains a provocative and influential film that acts as both a timepiece and a terrifying crystal ball.  

The film follows respected anchorman Howard Beale, who we’re introduced to just as he gets fired from the network he works for, UBS. Distraught, Beale announces that he’s going to kill himself on air à la Christine Chubbuck, sending ratings through the roof. The black dramedy then takes many wild turns beginning with the ratings-hungry TV executives keeping Beale on the air as he mentally breaks down night after night. Other plot points include the beautiful, albeit heartless, reporter Diana Christensen (played by Faye Dunaway) thriving off Beale’s personal downfall, seducing another TV executive before getting him fired, and hiring a pseudo-Symbionese Liberation Army-type group to murder Beale on air as a way of kick-starting their next serialized program. 

The story is unbelievable and entrancing, while also nausea-inducing.

It feels absurd but somehow possible because as far-fetched as it seems, it also hits a little too close to home. In the 40 years since the film came out, we’ve seen the live broadcasts of ISIS beheading journalists, “Survivor” contestants well up with tears as they ingest live insects, and Donald Trump, the real estate mogul and one-time host of “The Apprentice,” running for the president of the United States (with an alarming amount of support).

“Network” is and will always be successful for its ineffably on-point prediction of how far television, media, and even our political climate could go.  

Director and writer Aaron Sorkin brought up a salient point when discussing the film with the Times: “You wish Chayefsky [the writer of ‘Network’] could come back to life long enough to write ‘The Internet.’”

There’s no question that Paddy Chayefsky’s take on 2016’s social media-obsessed, screen-covered world would make Orwell’s “1984” look primitive.

“Network” personifies the ‘70s well ― highlighting the era’s counterculture, anti-establishment and leftist feelings, fixations on Patty Hearst and the Mansons, hippies. Despite all of this, it shines the most when highlighting the perversion viewers feed off of as they watch television ― a perversion that has now extended to surfing the web and scrolling through our phones. That inimitable feeling of enticing viewers by constantly asking the question: “How far will they go?”

“Network” is an articulate indictment of American audiences.

It’s easy to recognize the fictional UBS station in the film in major stations like today’s FOX, particularly when you think of the absurdity FOX has housed over the years. From reality and talk shows to all of the other types of variety programming, the station has put out a slew of questionable broadcasts. Shows like “American Idol” or “The X-Factor” highlight the obsession we have with becoming famous.

Those are tame by comparison to shows like “I Want To Marry Harry,” where women were rallied and tricked into thinking they were vying for the love of Prince Harry, or even “Nanny 911,” which brought a British nanny into the homes of parents with “unruly children” and had her harshly calling out their ineptitude for rearing children, all while millions of other families relished in it. Schadenfreude is what drives so much of our media consumption, and “Network” plays with that fact in glorious ways.

Today, Howard Beale’s iconic “mad as hell” speech isn’t a joke or an exaggeration anymore. It’s real. People are dying in the streets and we’ve been apathetic, but Trump is convincing so many Americans to get mad.

Our current political climate has its very own Beale in Trump.

Trump’s wall and reality star-cum-politician career path sounds insane to many of us because he’s a real-life Beale. A fact that is only solidified when people describe him like this:

“Every critic, every detractor, will have to bow down to President Trump. It’s everyone who’s ever doubted Donald, who ever disagreed, who ever challenged him. It is the ultimate revenge to become the most powerful man in the universe.” ― Omarosa

To describe our media landscape, as a whole, is to say that it is seductive, entertaining, divisive, corrupting and desensitizing.

“Network” is a didactic work of art that reminds us of the media’s wiles, making it the sort of film that should be brought into classrooms around the world. Whether you’re of the generation that adored “Dr. Strangelove” or “The Colbert Report” or “Black Mirror,” one that preferred the movie star Ronald Reagan in the White House over the racist, apoplectic Donald Trump, “Network” unpacks a media that has only grown more exploitative as years have gone on and will surely have viewers new and old walking away wondering why we’ve only veered closer to that dystopia.

David Foster Wallace summed up the movie’s great thesis, without ever intending to. Particularly if you think of “TV” standing in for film, news channels and the internet.

During a 1993 interview pertaining to his essay “E Unibus Pluram,” he said:

“TV’s ‘real’ agenda is to be ‘liked,’ because if you like what you’re seeing, you’ll stay tuned. TV is completely unabashed about this; it’s its sole raison… It’s seldom acknowledged that viewers’ relationship with TV is, albeit debased, intricate and profound.”

Will you stay tuned?

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

The relationship we have with the media is a complicated one. We binge, hate-watch, cry, and laugh with characters familiar and unfamiliar. We equally suspend our disbelief and get all swept up in it.

Few films have summarized (and satirized) this relationship as well as the movie “Network” ― a shocking feat when you remember that the film came out in 1976.

Still, “Network” remains a provocative and influential film that acts as both a timepiece and a terrifying crystal ball.  

The film follows respected anchorman Howard Beale, who we’re introduced to just as he gets fired from the network he works for, UBS. Distraught, Beale announces that he’s going to kill himself on air à la Christine Chubbuck, sending ratings through the roof. The black dramedy then takes many wild turns beginning with the ratings-hungry TV executives keeping Beale on the air as he mentally breaks down night after night. Other plot points include the beautiful, albeit heartless, reporter Diana Christensen (played by Faye Dunaway) thriving off Beale’s personal downfall, seducing another TV executive before getting him fired, and hiring a pseudo-Symbionese Liberation Army-type group to murder Beale on air as a way of kick-starting their next serialized program. 

The story is unbelievable and entrancing, while also nausea-inducing.

It feels absurd but somehow possible because as far-fetched as it seems, it also hits a little too close to home. In the 40 years since the film came out, we’ve seen the live broadcasts of ISIS beheading journalists, “Survivor” contestants well up with tears as they ingest live insects, and Donald Trump, the real estate mogul and one-time host of “The Apprentice,” running for the president of the United States (with an alarming amount of support).

“Network” is and will always be successful for its ineffably on-point prediction of how far television, media, and even our political climate could go.  

Director and writer Aaron Sorkin brought up a salient point when discussing the film with the Times: “You wish Chayefsky [the writer of ‘Network’] could come back to life long enough to write ‘The Internet.’”

There’s no question that Paddy Chayefsky’s take on 2016’s social media-obsessed, screen-covered world would make Orwell’s “1984” look primitive.

“Network” personifies the ‘70s well ― highlighting the era’s counterculture, anti-establishment and leftist feelings, fixations on Patty Hearst and the Mansons, hippies. Despite all of this, it shines the most when highlighting the perversion viewers feed off of as they watch television ― a perversion that has now extended to surfing the web and scrolling through our phones. That inimitable feeling of enticing viewers by constantly asking the question: “How far will they go?”

“Network” is an articulate indictment of American audiences.

It’s easy to recognize the fictional UBS station in the film in major stations like today’s FOX, particularly when you think of the absurdity FOX has housed over the years. From reality and talk shows to all of the other types of variety programming, the station has put out a slew of questionable broadcasts. Shows like “American Idol” or “The X-Factor” highlight the obsession we have with becoming famous.

Those are tame by comparison to shows like “I Want To Marry Harry,” where women were rallied and tricked into thinking they were vying for the love of Prince Harry, or even “Nanny 911,” which brought a British nanny into the homes of parents with “unruly children” and had her harshly calling out their ineptitude for rearing children, all while millions of other families relished in it. Schadenfreude is what drives so much of our media consumption, and “Network” plays with that fact in glorious ways.

Today, Howard Beale’s iconic “mad as hell” speech isn’t a joke or an exaggeration anymore. It’s real. People are dying in the streets and we’ve been apathetic, but Trump is convincing so many Americans to get mad.

Our current political climate has its very own Beale in Trump.

Trump’s wall and reality star-cum-politician career path sounds insane to many of us because he’s a real-life Beale. A fact that is only solidified when people describe him like this:

“Every critic, every detractor, will have to bow down to President Trump. It’s everyone who’s ever doubted Donald, who ever disagreed, who ever challenged him. It is the ultimate revenge to become the most powerful man in the universe.” ― Omarosa

To describe our media landscape, as a whole, is to say that it is seductive, entertaining, divisive, corrupting and desensitizing.

“Network” is a didactic work of art that reminds us of the media’s wiles, making it the sort of film that should be brought into classrooms around the world. Whether you’re of the generation that adored “Dr. Strangelove” or “The Colbert Report” or “Black Mirror,” one that preferred the movie star Ronald Reagan in the White House over the racist, apoplectic Donald Trump, “Network” unpacks a media that has only grown more exploitative as years have gone on and will surely have viewers new and old walking away wondering why we’ve only veered closer to that dystopia.

David Foster Wallace summed up the movie’s great thesis, without ever intending to. Particularly if you think of “TV” standing in for film, news channels and the internet.

During a 1993 interview pertaining to his essay “E Unibus Pluram,” he said:

“TV’s ‘real’ agenda is to be ‘liked,’ because if you like what you’re seeing, you’ll stay tuned. TV is completely unabashed about this; it’s its sole raison… It’s seldom acknowledged that viewers’ relationship with TV is, albeit debased, intricate and profound.”

Will you stay tuned?

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

America Ferrera Explains Why It’s So Important For Latinos To Vote

America Ferrera wants Americans to do themselves and the world a huge favor and vote this November. 
In an interview with The MVTO, the 32-year-old “Superstore” star explained why she feels there is nothing more important than …

America Ferrera wants Americans to do themselves and the world a huge favor and vote this November. 

In an interview with The MVTO, the 32-year-old “Superstore” star explained why she feels there is nothing more important than the upcoming presidential election. 

“The stakes are so high for every American,” she explained. “And not just America, the world, because what happens in the U.S. has ramifications globally, as we’ve seen.”

Ferrera, who is Voto Latino’s Artist Coalition Co-Chair, also shared a pointed message to Latinos, explaining that when they vote, they’re not just voting for federal and local leaders, they’re voting for the best interest of their families, friends and communities.

“It is important to show up for yourself and know, especially inside the Latino community, that we have so much power, we have so much potential that we could exercise by using our voices in the voting booth. And I think that when we show up and we decide to represent ourselves in the voting booth is when things will change for Latin American communities in the United States, so we need to show up for ourselves and exercise that power,” she said. 

She summed it up best earlier in the interview: “What could be more important than being part of an election that will shape your lives and the lives of your families and your children, who you’re leaving behind?”

Right on. 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Kristen Chenoweth Heads Back to Broadway with “My Love Letter To Broadway” But First, Brings Us “The Art Of Elegance”.

From Glinda the Good Witch in “Wicked” to the the equally devilish Velma Von Tussle in the upcoming musical “Hairspray Live” (Fall 2017) Kristen Chenoweth takes on roles that the LGBT community can seemingly always relate to. This fall, Chenoweth is not only back with a new album of standards, appropriately titled “The Art of Elegance” (September 23rd) but back for a limited engagement in November on Broadway, titled “My Love Letter to Broadway”. She managed to take some time away from rehearsals and promoting her album to chat with me about her new album, what it’s like to be heading back to Broadway, her love of Bravo’s “Real Housewives”, and what she feels is her purpose in life just may be; and how it involves the LGBT community.

2016-09-19-1474323430-7367108-AlbumPhoto.tiff

You are finally coming back to Broadway! The Broadway and gay community are both rejoicing! With your touring and recording a new album, why was now the right time to go back to The Great White Way?
They asked me. I was iike, well, how often do these opportunities come along, you know? It had actually been in talks for months, but it finally seemed to be the right window of time. I knew I was going to be having an album come out, so it seemed like the right time to do it, right after my album came out. I am really excited and I really want to pay homage to the women that have done it before me. I really want to knock this out of the park, so the show will be different every night. There will never be two nights that are the same, so material will be shifting in and out. I’ve entitled it “My Love Letter to Broadway”, which gives me a lot of room to celebrate what I love the most. I’m really excited, and I really want to make it special. I really don’t ever do a show where I don’t feel that way, but this is Broadway!

You are clearly going to have a top notch show, but you are kicking it up one more notch with the amazing fashion designer Christian Siriano doing your costuming!
I’m the smartest girl I know! He’s amazing, I love him & I love “Project Runway”. I never for one second thought he would say yes, but when you have no fear of him saying yes, you ask and when he says yes, I am like “are you kidding”?! He’s already nailed it with the album artwork, so we will probably live in that arena.

You recently were at the Borgata in Atlantic City, N.J. and your performance captivated so many of us. I can only imagine what a brand new Broadway show is going to be like.
Thank you! You know, I was a little nervous about that one, because casinos are not really where I normally go. I have to tell you though, the audience and the love I felt there was such a surprise. I looked into the history of the Borgata and I realized that if you are going to play a casino, this is where you go! I mean, I didn’t grow up around casinos, I didn’t know. I mean, I’m used to playing at Carnegie Hall. This place was fantastic, I loved it.

I think the best thing about “The Art Of Elegance” is that while we are used to hearing you in soaring Broadway anthems, the transition to hearing you sing tracks like “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered” and “Smile” is absolutely seamless.
Yes, that’s exactly what I wanted to do. I have sung probably six of those songs before in my life, growing up, different versions of them. The album was new for me, for my voice. What’s happening is that the voice is deepening and it’s allowing for some of this material to land in a different way for me. The soprano has been so good to me over the years, and it’s still there, it will still be represented, just not necessarily on this album. When I was really getting into the meat of “I Get Along Without You Very Well” which I didn’t know, I was thinking “where have I been, I must sing this”. Then with “I’m a Fool To Want You” which Frank Sinatra wrote, recorded and sang himself during his breakup with Ava Gardner, i was unaware. Of course I’ve sung “Someone To Watch Over Me” and “Smile” and “The Very Thought Of You”, but I had not sung some of the other stuff. Everybody says “this album is my favorite”. Whatever artist you speak with, whatever album they have out then, is their favorite. Honestly for me, this is my favorite one. It’s just a new place in my voice that obviously existed and a place that I feel safe in.

2016-09-19-1474323599-8350170-kristinchenowethrevealsartofelegancealbumartwork.jpg

A fun fact about the Borgata that you will especially appreciate is that the Season Four reunion of “The Real Housewives of New Jersey” was filmed at the Borgata.
Are you kidding?! Oh wow you’re right!

After your fantastic appearances on “Watch What Happens Live” we know you are as much of a Housewife lover as the rest of us, so it has to be asked. What franchise do you live the most?
You know, I can’t believe you’re asking me that, it’s iike asking me my favorite song. You know, I think I am always going to be partial to New York, maybe because I live here. Between Sonja, and LuAnn, and Bethenny, and Jules, I love them. Dorinda is my favorite, I just love her. They called her the “village idiot” during the reunion, which I didn’t appreciate. She’s even making me want to cut my hair.

Well, since you are playing “Velma Von Tussle” in the upcoming “Hairspray Live” you may have a quandary; Velma Von Tussle did not have short hair!
No, but she has a fantastic wig (laughs)! Her wig is to die for.

2016-09-19-1474323474-897213-AlbumPhoto.png

How different is doing something like a multi camera “Hairspray Live” television musical as opposed to a stage production of something like “Wicked” or “You’re A Good Man Charlie Brown”?
It’s not that different, except we just do it once. I would like the opportunity to redeem myself, thank you very much!

You are able to do things like Velma Von Tussle, and voiceovers like “Gabi” in “Rio 2” or “Fifi” in “The Peanuts Movie”, but then you can seamlessly morph to doing something like “The Art of Elegance”. Is it hard to go from such fun material to really sleek and elegant material?
That’s a really good question, and honestly the answer is yes, especially when I have to switch it over in the middle. For example, when I was recording the album I took a long time on this one. I took a long time, several months, and I toured while I was doing it. Touring and going into the album wasn’t so hard, but what was hard was fitting a day in for “My Little Pony”. I feel like I have to switch gears in such a strong way that I try to get one section of something done before going to do something like say, “Rio 2” or “My Little Pony”. I need the palate change, it keeps me interested. To do it in the middle of things though, it gets like “I have to take a shower” (laughs). Doing this album though, and Broadway and then going into “Hairspray”, it’s all kind of in this world.

As i told you in the beginning, it bears repeating; the gay community could not adore you more. The world we are in now is very topsy turvey and coming from a small town like Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, is it sometimes hard for you sometimes to come from such a small town, yet be so connected to the Broadway community that is so incredibly diverse?
Oh not sometimes, all the time. I definitely lost fans over it and because of it. I do care, but there are going to be people that don’t like you because you have a weird haircut, because you have a funny speaking voice, because you’re a soprano, everything, If somebody is not going to like me because of the way I sing or they’re not appreciative of whatever I do in show business, I’m okay with that. It’s a little bit harder when it’s because of the person I am. If it’s hard for me, I can only imagine what it’s like when it’s the actual gay or transgender community.

In my concert, I am always going to do a Christian song, because I’m a big old Christian, and that’s just how it’s gonna be. One of the purposes in my life, as a little girl, that I did not realize was going to become a big thing was to be on stage and to sing about my faith, and to also say that I am gay rights activist too. That doesn’t always go together, but it should. Is that my purpose? I guess so yeah; and I’m good with that. I would hope that anyone in any faith would choose to be a human rights activist; I think that this is the civil rights issue of our time. I don’t know, it’s not me saying that since I have been accepted, I am going to get on board this train; it would have been a lot easier for me not to get on that train. But I am also a person; I’ve seen friends be persecuted and be hurt. I know they’re good people and they’re not going to hell. The God I know and worship is not that.

Photo credit: Gian di Andrea Stefano
www.officialkristinchenoweth.com/
https://twitter.com/KChenoweth

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

From Glinda the Good Witch in “Wicked” to the the equally devilish Velma Von Tussle in the upcoming musical “Hairspray Live” (Fall 2017) Kristen Chenoweth takes on roles that the LGBT community can seemingly always relate to. This fall, Chenoweth is not only back with a new album of standards, appropriately titled “The Art of Elegance” (September 23rd) but back for a limited engagement in November on Broadway, titled “My Love Letter to Broadway”. She managed to take some time away from rehearsals and promoting her album to chat with me about her new album, what it’s like to be heading back to Broadway, her love of Bravo’s “Real Housewives”, and what she feels is her purpose in life just may be; and how it involves the LGBT community.

2016-09-19-1474323430-7367108-AlbumPhoto.tiff

You are finally coming back to Broadway! The Broadway and gay community are both rejoicing! With your touring and recording a new album, why was now the right time to go back to The Great White Way?
They asked me. I was iike, well, how often do these opportunities come along, you know? It had actually been in talks for months, but it finally seemed to be the right window of time. I knew I was going to be having an album come out, so it seemed like the right time to do it, right after my album came out. I am really excited and I really want to pay homage to the women that have done it before me. I really want to knock this out of the park, so the show will be different every night. There will never be two nights that are the same, so material will be shifting in and out. I’ve entitled it “My Love Letter to Broadway”, which gives me a lot of room to celebrate what I love the most. I’m really excited, and I really want to make it special. I really don’t ever do a show where I don’t feel that way, but this is Broadway!

You are clearly going to have a top notch show, but you are kicking it up one more notch with the amazing fashion designer Christian Siriano doing your costuming!
I’m the smartest girl I know! He’s amazing, I love him & I love “Project Runway”. I never for one second thought he would say yes, but when you have no fear of him saying yes, you ask and when he says yes, I am like “are you kidding”?! He’s already nailed it with the album artwork, so we will probably live in that arena.

You recently were at the Borgata in Atlantic City, N.J. and your performance captivated so many of us. I can only imagine what a brand new Broadway show is going to be like.
Thank you! You know, I was a little nervous about that one, because casinos are not really where I normally go. I have to tell you though, the audience and the love I felt there was such a surprise. I looked into the history of the Borgata and I realized that if you are going to play a casino, this is where you go! I mean, I didn’t grow up around casinos, I didn’t know. I mean, I’m used to playing at Carnegie Hall. This place was fantastic, I loved it.

I think the best thing about “The Art Of Elegance” is that while we are used to hearing you in soaring Broadway anthems, the transition to hearing you sing tracks like “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered” and “Smile” is absolutely seamless.
Yes, that’s exactly what I wanted to do. I have sung probably six of those songs before in my life, growing up, different versions of them. The album was new for me, for my voice. What’s happening is that the voice is deepening and it’s allowing for some of this material to land in a different way for me. The soprano has been so good to me over the years, and it’s still there, it will still be represented, just not necessarily on this album. When I was really getting into the meat of “I Get Along Without You Very Well” which I didn’t know, I was thinking “where have I been, I must sing this”. Then with “I’m a Fool To Want You” which Frank Sinatra wrote, recorded and sang himself during his breakup with Ava Gardner, i was unaware. Of course I’ve sung “Someone To Watch Over Me” and “Smile” and “The Very Thought Of You”, but I had not sung some of the other stuff. Everybody says “this album is my favorite”. Whatever artist you speak with, whatever album they have out then, is their favorite. Honestly for me, this is my favorite one. It’s just a new place in my voice that obviously existed and a place that I feel safe in.

2016-09-19-1474323599-8350170-kristinchenowethrevealsartofelegancealbumartwork.jpg

A fun fact about the Borgata that you will especially appreciate is that the Season Four reunion of “The Real Housewives of New Jersey” was filmed at the Borgata.
Are you kidding?! Oh wow you’re right!

After your fantastic appearances on “Watch What Happens Live” we know you are as much of a Housewife lover as the rest of us, so it has to be asked. What franchise do you live the most?
You know, I can’t believe you’re asking me that, it’s iike asking me my favorite song. You know, I think I am always going to be partial to New York, maybe because I live here. Between Sonja, and LuAnn, and Bethenny, and Jules, I love them. Dorinda is my favorite, I just love her. They called her the “village idiot” during the reunion, which I didn’t appreciate. She’s even making me want to cut my hair.

Well, since you are playing “Velma Von Tussle” in the upcoming “Hairspray Live” you may have a quandary; Velma Von Tussle did not have short hair!
No, but she has a fantastic wig (laughs)! Her wig is to die for.

2016-09-19-1474323474-897213-AlbumPhoto.png

How different is doing something like a multi camera “Hairspray Live” television musical as opposed to a stage production of something like “Wicked” or “You’re A Good Man Charlie Brown”?
It’s not that different, except we just do it once. I would like the opportunity to redeem myself, thank you very much!

You are able to do things like Velma Von Tussle, and voiceovers like “Gabi” in “Rio 2” or “Fifi” in “The Peanuts Movie”, but then you can seamlessly morph to doing something like “The Art of Elegance”. Is it hard to go from such fun material to really sleek and elegant material?
That’s a really good question, and honestly the answer is yes, especially when I have to switch it over in the middle. For example, when I was recording the album I took a long time on this one. I took a long time, several months, and I toured while I was doing it. Touring and going into the album wasn’t so hard, but what was hard was fitting a day in for “My Little Pony”. I feel like I have to switch gears in such a strong way that I try to get one section of something done before going to do something like say, “Rio 2” or “My Little Pony”. I need the palate change, it keeps me interested. To do it in the middle of things though, it gets like “I have to take a shower” (laughs). Doing this album though, and Broadway and then going into “Hairspray”, it’s all kind of in this world.

As i told you in the beginning, it bears repeating; the gay community could not adore you more. The world we are in now is very topsy turvey and coming from a small town like Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, is it sometimes hard for you sometimes to come from such a small town, yet be so connected to the Broadway community that is so incredibly diverse?
Oh not sometimes, all the time. I definitely lost fans over it and because of it. I do care, but there are going to be people that don’t like you because you have a weird haircut, because you have a funny speaking voice, because you’re a soprano, everything, If somebody is not going to like me because of the way I sing or they’re not appreciative of whatever I do in show business, I’m okay with that. It’s a little bit harder when it’s because of the person I am. If it’s hard for me, I can only imagine what it’s like when it’s the actual gay or transgender community.

In my concert, I am always going to do a Christian song, because I’m a big old Christian, and that’s just how it’s gonna be. One of the purposes in my life, as a little girl, that I did not realize was going to become a big thing was to be on stage and to sing about my faith, and to also say that I am gay rights activist too. That doesn’t always go together, but it should. Is that my purpose? I guess so yeah; and I’m good with that. I would hope that anyone in any faith would choose to be a human rights activist; I think that this is the civil rights issue of our time. I don’t know, it’s not me saying that since I have been accepted, I am going to get on board this train; it would have been a lot easier for me not to get on that train. But I am also a person; I’ve seen friends be persecuted and be hurt. I know they’re good people and they’re not going to hell. The God I know and worship is not that.

Photo credit: Gian di Andrea Stefano
www.officialkristinchenoweth.com/
https://twitter.com/KChenoweth

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

What’s New On Netflix In October 2016?

Netflix is making you king of the world … or the couch, maybe.
Basically, all of your favorite movies are coming to the streaming service in October. We’re talking about “Titanic,” “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off,” &ldq…

Netflix is making you king of the world … or the couch, maybe.

Basically, all of your favorite movies are coming to the streaming service in October. We’re talking about “Titanic,” “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off,” “Dazed and Confused” and more. 

Yeah, people. McConaughey is coming in October! 

Check out the rest of the titles below. It’s, you know, all right … all right, all right!

 

Oct. 1

  • “A Cinderella Story” (2004)

  • “Barbershop 2: Back in Business” (2004)

  • “Blue Streak” (1999)

  • “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” (1961)

  • “Dazed and Confused” (1993)

  • “Dr. Dolittle: Tail to the Chief” (2008)

  • “Fairy Tale: A True Story” (1997)

  • “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” (1986)

  • “Gentleman’s Agreement” (1947)

  • “Ghost Town” (2008)

  • “Grizzly Man” (2005)

  • “How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days” (2003)

  • “Millennium” (1989)

  • “Murder Maps” Season 2

  • “My Little Pony Equestria Girls: Legend of Everfree” (2016)

  • “Once Upon a Time in the West” (1968)

  • “Oriented” (2015)

  • “Patton” (1970)

  • “Picture This!” (2008)

  • “Pooh’s Grand Adventure: The Search for Christopher Robin” (1997)

  • “The Queen of the Damned” (2002)

  • “Quiz Show” (1994)

  • “Robotech” (1985)

  • “RV” (2006)

  • “Saving Mr. Wu” (2015)

  • “Snake Eyes” (1998)

  • “Snow Day” (2000)

  • “Sphere” (1998)

  • “Three Kings” (1999)

  • “Titanic” (1997)

  • “Unforgiven” (1992)

  • “The Uninvited” (2009)

  • “Unsealed: Alien Files” Season 4

  • “Without a Paddle” (2004)

Oct. 3

  • “Dheepan” (2015)

Oct. 4

  • “American Horror Story: Hotel” (Season 5)

  • “Chevalier” (2015)

  • “Dartmoor Killing” (2015)

  • “The Flash” Season 2

  • “The Grinder” Season 1

Oct. 5

  • “Arrow” Season 4

Oct. 6

  • “iZombie” Season 2

Oct. 7

  • “13TH” (Netflix Original) (2016)

  • “Dinotrux” (Season 3, Netflix Original)

  • “The Ranch” (Season 1, Part 2, Netflix Original)

  • “Russell Peters: Almost Famous” (Netflix Original)

  • “The Siege of Jadotville” (Netflix Original) (2016)

  • “Supernatural” Season 11

Oct. 8

  • “The Originals” Season 3

  • “Vampire Diaries” Season 7

Oct. 10

  • “Kuromukuro” (Season 2, Netflix Original)

  • “Love Between the Covers” (2015)

Oct. 12

  • “Justin Timberlake + The Tennessee Kids” (2016, Netflix Original)

Oct. 13

  • “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow” Season 1

  • “Mascots” (2016, Netflix Original)

Oct. 14

  • “Haters Back Off!” (Season 1, Netflix Original)

  • “Project MC2” (Season 3, Netflix Original)

  • “Sky Ladder: The Art of Cai Guo­Qiang” (2016, Netflix Original)

Oct. 15

  • “Being George Clooney” (2016)

  • “Chapo: el escape del siglo” (2016)

  • “Glitch” (Season 1, Netflix Original)

  • “Power Rangers Dino Super Charge” Season 1, Part 1

Oct. 16

  • “Dark Matter” Season 2

Oct. 21

  • “Black Mirror” (Season 3, Part 1, Netflix Original)

  • “Containment” Season 1

  • “Joe Rogan: Triggered” (Netflix Original)­

  • “Midnight Diner: Tokyo Stories” (Netflix Original)

  • “The Mr. Peabody and Sherman Show” (Season 3, Netflix Original)

  • “Word Party” (Season 2, Netflix Original) 

Oct. 24

  • “Doctor Foster” Season 1

Oct. 25

  • “Big Eyes” (2014)

Oct. 26

  • “Jesus Camp” (2006)

  • “Kung Fu Panda 3” (2016)

Oct. 28

  • “7 años” (2016, Netflix Original)

  • “I Am the Pretty Thing That Lives in the House” (2016, Netflix Original)

  • “Into the Inferno” (2016, Netflix Original)

  • “Skylanders Academy” (Season 1, Netflix Original)

  • “Trailer Park Boys: Out of the Park: Europe” (Netflix Original)

Oct. 29

  • “The Fall” (Season 3, Netflix Original)

Oct. 31

  • “Chewing Gum” (Season 1, Netflix Original)

Don’t know what to watch on Netflix? Message us on Facebook Messenger for TV and movie recommendations from our editors!

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

A Modern-Day Fairy Tale That Works To Make Sense Of War

“We make up the sense of things after they happen,” a character in Marisa Silver’s new novel, Little Nothing, says. “We tell stories. This happened because of that. We string things together one by one so that it seems like there’s a reason to it all. But there’s no reason.” 

It makes sense that Agata, who tried for years to conceive with her husband Vaclav, would take a cynical view of the world. The couple lives in an unnamed war-torn country in Eastern Europe, and struggles to see clearly amid the blustery winds of modern Western thought. Centuries-old practices and beliefs are disrupted by peculiar technological and medical advancements, and magical thinking is called into question.

When they do finally give birth to a daughter, Agata and Vaclav are troubled to discover that she was born a dwarf ― a young woman with a conventionally beautiful face, but who struggles to find companionship among classmates in their small community. They love her anyway (this isn’t the evil stepmother sort of fairy tale) and she works alongside Vaclav in his plumbing business. But as the couple grows older, they start to worry about who will care for their daughter ― Pavla, meaning “Little” ― once they’re gone. This catalyzes a series of experiments, prescribed by a quackish doctor whose assistant, Danilo, discovers that he has feelings for Pavla.  

Danilo is ordered to build a table that will stretch Pavla out to the size of a woman of average height. He does, and finds that the neat process of building a tool puts his mind at ease. Somehow, the experiment works, but its consequences are dire: Agata and Vaclav are exiled from their community once word of their cruel treatments catch wind, and Pavla inexplicably grows fur on her face, beginning a slow, strange transformation from woman to wolf.

As in a fairy tale, Silver’s stories make logical leaps that are at first unsatisfying: what, exactly, caused Pavla to transform? And why did it happen? Is there a lesson to be learned? But the story explains itself as it unfolds; just as its often impossible to pinpoint a single cause of war, it’s difficult to trace a tragic, startling occurrence back to its root. Instead, the characters in Little Nothing find meaning and solace in coincidences, drawing connections where perhaps there are none.

The book, then, is both a parable and a full-fledged, richly told story, with clearly drawn characters who beckon us to come along with them on their journeys. We follow Pavla as she meets hunters and soldiers. We follow Danilo to the insane asylum he’s wrongly placed in. Along the way, Silver shows us her capacity for fleet-footed writing. Little Nothing is a quick, pleasurable read, but one that’s full of mysteries to stop and unpack.

The bottom line:

Silver’s book is magical and parabolic, but it doesn’t have the stark, curious language of a fairy tale. Instead, she adorns her fable with earthy imagery, crafting a rich setting and lovable characters. 

Who wrote it:

Marisa Silver is the author of Mary Coin, The God War, and No Direction Home. Her short story collections have been included on the New York Times Notable Book list, and the Los Angeles Times Best Book of the Year list. 

Who will read it: 

Anyone interested in folkloric literature, like Tea Obrecht’s The Tiger’s Wife. Anyone interested in stories about Eastern European conflict, like Anthony Marra’s The Tsar of Love and Techno.

What other reviews think:

LA Times:Little Nothing celebrates not only the unruly and lost parts of all our lives but also the possibility of their reordering and comprehension.”

Washington Post: “Like [Angela] Carter, but in her own way, Silver manages to transform the fairy tale without losing its power.”

Opening lines:

“’Predstavte si kvetinu!’ the midwife yells, her voice reaching the baby as warped and concave sounds. ‘Pictuuure a flowaahhherrr.’” 

Notable passage:

“The town has suffered in the war, but the destruction is haphazard and irrational. A perfectly intact bookshop stands next to what was once a ladies’ dress shop but which is now the site of a massacre of mannequins, some armless or headless, all of them naked, having been stripped of the latest fashion by looters.”

Little Nothing
by Marisa Silver
Blue Rider Press, $27.00
Published Sept. 13

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

“We make up the sense of things after they happen,” a character in Marisa Silver’s new novel, Little Nothing, says. “We tell stories. This happened because of that. We string things together one by one so that it seems like there’s a reason to it all. But there’s no reason.” 

It makes sense that Agata, who tried for years to conceive with her husband Vaclav, would take a cynical view of the world. The couple lives in an unnamed war-torn country in Eastern Europe, and struggles to see clearly amid the blustery winds of modern Western thought. Centuries-old practices and beliefs are disrupted by peculiar technological and medical advancements, and magical thinking is called into question.

When they do finally give birth to a daughter, Agata and Vaclav are troubled to discover that she was born a dwarf ― a young woman with a conventionally beautiful face, but who struggles to find companionship among classmates in their small community. They love her anyway (this isn’t the evil stepmother sort of fairy tale) and she works alongside Vaclav in his plumbing business. But as the couple grows older, they start to worry about who will care for their daughter ― Pavla, meaning “Little” ― once they’re gone. This catalyzes a series of experiments, prescribed by a quackish doctor whose assistant, Danilo, discovers that he has feelings for Pavla.  

Danilo is ordered to build a table that will stretch Pavla out to the size of a woman of average height. He does, and finds that the neat process of building a tool puts his mind at ease. Somehow, the experiment works, but its consequences are dire: Agata and Vaclav are exiled from their community once word of their cruel treatments catch wind, and Pavla inexplicably grows fur on her face, beginning a slow, strange transformation from woman to wolf.

As in a fairy tale, Silver’s stories make logical leaps that are at first unsatisfying: what, exactly, caused Pavla to transform? And why did it happen? Is there a lesson to be learned? But the story explains itself as it unfolds; just as its often impossible to pinpoint a single cause of war, it’s difficult to trace a tragic, startling occurrence back to its root. Instead, the characters in Little Nothing find meaning and solace in coincidences, drawing connections where perhaps there are none.

The book, then, is both a parable and a full-fledged, richly told story, with clearly drawn characters who beckon us to come along with them on their journeys. We follow Pavla as she meets hunters and soldiers. We follow Danilo to the insane asylum he’s wrongly placed in. Along the way, Silver shows us her capacity for fleet-footed writing. Little Nothing is a quick, pleasurable read, but one that’s full of mysteries to stop and unpack.

The bottom line:

Silver’s book is magical and parabolic, but it doesn’t have the stark, curious language of a fairy tale. Instead, she adorns her fable with earthy imagery, crafting a rich setting and lovable characters. 

Who wrote it:

Marisa Silver is the author of Mary Coin, The God War, and No Direction Home. Her short story collections have been included on the New York Times Notable Book list, and the Los Angeles Times Best Book of the Year list. 

Who will read it: 

Anyone interested in folkloric literature, like Tea Obrecht’s The Tiger’s Wife. Anyone interested in stories about Eastern European conflict, like Anthony Marra’s The Tsar of Love and Techno.

What other reviews think:

LA Times:Little Nothing celebrates not only the unruly and lost parts of all our lives but also the possibility of their reordering and comprehension.”

Washington Post: “Like [Angela] Carter, but in her own way, Silver manages to transform the fairy tale without losing its power.”

Opening lines:

“’Predstavte si kvetinu!’ the midwife yells, her voice reaching the baby as warped and concave sounds. ‘Pictuuure a flowaahhherrr.’” 

Notable passage:

“The town has suffered in the war, but the destruction is haphazard and irrational. A perfectly intact bookshop stands next to what was once a ladies’ dress shop but which is now the site of a massacre of mannequins, some armless or headless, all of them naked, having been stripped of the latest fashion by looters.”

Little Nothing
by Marisa Silver
Blue Rider Press, $27.00
Published Sept. 13

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Warpaint’s Theresa Wayman On The Band’s ‘Vivid’ New Album And Inevitably Questioning Her Career

There’s a quiet intensity to Theresa Wayman, the guitarist and vocalist for indie art-rock band Warpaint. She sat beside me on a hotter than hell summer day wearing a flowy short dress, knee-high socks and vaguely smudged black eye-makeup. She was clearly a bit tired from the “huzzah” of her musician’s life but enveloped me in a lovely conversation for nearly 40 minutes. 

Since the women-only quartet’s 2008 EP, “Exquisite Corpse,” the group has been releasing echoey, ethereal sounds that are easy to distinguish from the oversaturated pop-music scene. But they’ve changed things up with their newest release, “Heads Up,” out Sept. 23. They’re still as dark and delicious as ever, but they’ve expanded into catchier and faster beats. In a way, their new music is easier to digest. 

As Wayman wrapped herself in a cardigan and fiddled with her necklace drinking a soda, we spoke about the band’s past records, it’s “moody” reputation and how she defines success. The guitarist was humble and spoke with conviction, at times getting lost in her thoughts.

Did you feel pressure to make a more energetic, dance-y album, especially in the current landscape of music?

You definitely can’t get a hit song on the radio that’s not energetic in America. That’s never going to happen ― not that that’s, like, what we were intentionally aiming for or anything. But I don’t really feel pressure. If anything, I feel pressure to try to find what’s next that’s not happening right now.

But you did that when you initially started recording years ago.

I guess so, yeah. But I think that, as an artist, that’s something that fuels me. So I’m always searching for what I feel like is new territory. But there are certain things that have been mainstays in our musical influence for years and years before they were even as popular as they are now. Such as things like hip-hop and trip-hop and electronic music. Stuff like that.

What are your perceptions of the current music scene?

In a positive way, I think that everything is wide open. That’s really exciting because anyone can do anything and … the music that’s being made now is generally a mishmash of so many different influences. But a lot of pop music is really innovative, and I love that. I’m starting to really appreciate the clarity in pop music. I feel like it’s really brave … in the sense that it’s revealing and that it’s people making decisions and sticking to them in a way. It’s a huge statement … like, “I am this and you take it and do what you want with it. Either you like it or you don’t like it.”

Maybe that’s just the way I define it because I’m coming from a past where I’ve been more hidden. Our band, in general on our last two albums, was more hidden and sort of reverb and [had] like a dreamy, impressionist way of being. And it’s nice. I think some of that was an aesthetic choice, but some of it, too, was maybe being unsure. And so … I think this album is more vivid and more sure of itself, and intentionally so. 

What’s the chemistry like between the bandmates? If you were on a road trip, who would be the annoying backseat driver, who’d be the driver, who’d be getting the snacks?

Well, I’m just going to say we kind of all fill all roles at different points. There’s clearly differences in our personalities, but I don’t know if I care to define it on the record. Just kidding, but we actually all … switch off playing these roles with each other. One day someone’s more the ‘mom’ and the other one’s the ‘kid’ and then it switches and that’s nice. I mean, don’t get me wrong, there’s definitely conflict. We’ve gotten really good at hearing each other out and respecting each other knowing ultimately where everyone’s coming from and not getting wrapped up in a moment of irritation.

How do you define success?

I feel like, if we are doing our best and we are playing at the top of our game, then we will actually succeed in a larger way and I definitely invite that. I’d love to be more recognized for this album than we were for the last two and to have our popularity continually grow. I’m into that because I feel like, also, we’re doing something unique that kind of deserves that attention. 

What’re your thoughts on Warpaint sometimes being depicted as dark and ominous?

I’m OK with all those adjectives. I know that we are moody. We have moody music and we are kind of dark. There’s like a somber quality to our music, for sure. But then it’s also groovy and our personalities can be very bubbly and we laugh a lot and that comes across when we’re playing as well … We have fun with each other so that’s kind of a nice juxtaposition. I like it when bands are emotional in their music, in whatever way. It doesn’t mean it has to be slow or minimal or something, but I just like emotionalism. 

We’ve seen music become more political lately. Where do you think politics fits into music?

Anybody who wants to put politics in their music should. And it’s probably a good thing because sometimes, as a musician, with everything that’s going on in the world, I kind of wonder what I’m doing. Like, should I even be doing this? Is it even important? Given the fact that there’s a lot of other ways in which the world needs help. So sometimes I question the whole thing in general. I love it when people are political in their music.

Who are you listening to right now?

Honestly, I’ve been listening to Twenty One Pilots. They’re really kind of political, too. Not necessarily political but he’s talking about the inner life and struggle and sort of like bringing it to light and letting it be released in a way, which is super cool.

On Warpaint’s first EP, you collaborated with John Frusciante, the former guitarist for the Red Hot Chili Peppers. What do you think about the band’s new album? 

It’s a case of: They should keep writing music and keep doing it. They do what they do and I don’t think it’s really about whether it’s good or not, in a really weird way. It’s good to me, 100 percent, because I know their intention behind it. But I know them ― or I know a couple of them more than others. I know where they’re coming from so I feel like that’s what matters to me.

It’s not music I listen to, but I think that Flea is an incredible artist, in general, and he’s an incredible bass player obviously ― which is who he is and the way he lives his life. I know there’s intention and there’s integrity behind what he’s doing.

This interview has been edited and condensed for length and clarity.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

There’s a quiet intensity to Theresa Wayman, the guitarist and vocalist for indie art-rock band Warpaint. She sat beside me on a hotter than hell summer day wearing a flowy short dress, knee-high socks and vaguely smudged black eye-makeup. She was clearly a bit tired from the “huzzah” of her musician’s life but enveloped me in a lovely conversation for nearly 40 minutes. 

Since the women-only quartet’s 2008 EP, “Exquisite Corpse,” the group has been releasing echoey, ethereal sounds that are easy to distinguish from the oversaturated pop-music scene. But they’ve changed things up with their newest release, “Heads Up,” out Sept. 23. They’re still as dark and delicious as ever, but they’ve expanded into catchier and faster beats. In a way, their new music is easier to digest. 

As Wayman wrapped herself in a cardigan and fiddled with her necklace drinking a soda, we spoke about the band’s past records, it’s “moody” reputation and how she defines success. The guitarist was humble and spoke with conviction, at times getting lost in her thoughts.

Did you feel pressure to make a more energetic, dance-y album, especially in the current landscape of music?

You definitely can’t get a hit song on the radio that’s not energetic in America. That’s never going to happen ― not that that’s, like, what we were intentionally aiming for or anything. But I don’t really feel pressure. If anything, I feel pressure to try to find what’s next that’s not happening right now.

But you did that when you initially started recording years ago.

I guess so, yeah. But I think that, as an artist, that’s something that fuels me. So I’m always searching for what I feel like is new territory. But there are certain things that have been mainstays in our musical influence for years and years before they were even as popular as they are now. Such as things like hip-hop and trip-hop and electronic music. Stuff like that.

What are your perceptions of the current music scene?

In a positive way, I think that everything is wide open. That’s really exciting because anyone can do anything and … the music that’s being made now is generally a mishmash of so many different influences. But a lot of pop music is really innovative, and I love that. I’m starting to really appreciate the clarity in pop music. I feel like it’s really brave … in the sense that it’s revealing and that it’s people making decisions and sticking to them in a way. It’s a huge statement … like, “I am this and you take it and do what you want with it. Either you like it or you don’t like it.”

Maybe that’s just the way I define it because I’m coming from a past where I’ve been more hidden. Our band, in general on our last two albums, was more hidden and sort of reverb and [had] like a dreamy, impressionist way of being. And it’s nice. I think some of that was an aesthetic choice, but some of it, too, was maybe being unsure. And so … I think this album is more vivid and more sure of itself, and intentionally so. 

What’s the chemistry like between the bandmates? If you were on a road trip, who would be the annoying backseat driver, who’d be the driver, who’d be getting the snacks?

Well, I’m just going to say we kind of all fill all roles at different points. There’s clearly differences in our personalities, but I don’t know if I care to define it on the record. Just kidding, but we actually all … switch off playing these roles with each other. One day someone’s more the ‘mom’ and the other one’s the ‘kid’ and then it switches and that’s nice. I mean, don’t get me wrong, there’s definitely conflict. We’ve gotten really good at hearing each other out and respecting each other knowing ultimately where everyone’s coming from and not getting wrapped up in a moment of irritation.

How do you define success?

I feel like, if we are doing our best and we are playing at the top of our game, then we will actually succeed in a larger way and I definitely invite that. I’d love to be more recognized for this album than we were for the last two and to have our popularity continually grow. I’m into that because I feel like, also, we’re doing something unique that kind of deserves that attention. 

What’re your thoughts on Warpaint sometimes being depicted as dark and ominous?

I’m OK with all those adjectives. I know that we are moody. We have moody music and we are kind of dark. There’s like a somber quality to our music, for sure. But then it’s also groovy and our personalities can be very bubbly and we laugh a lot and that comes across when we’re playing as well … We have fun with each other so that’s kind of a nice juxtaposition. I like it when bands are emotional in their music, in whatever way. It doesn’t mean it has to be slow or minimal or something, but I just like emotionalism. 

We’ve seen music become more political lately. Where do you think politics fits into music?

Anybody who wants to put politics in their music should. And it’s probably a good thing because sometimes, as a musician, with everything that’s going on in the world, I kind of wonder what I’m doing. Like, should I even be doing this? Is it even important? Given the fact that there’s a lot of other ways in which the world needs help. So sometimes I question the whole thing in general. I love it when people are political in their music.

Who are you listening to right now?

Honestly, I’ve been listening to Twenty One Pilots. They’re really kind of political, too. Not necessarily political but he’s talking about the inner life and struggle and sort of like bringing it to light and letting it be released in a way, which is super cool.

On Warpaint’s first EP, you collaborated with John Frusciante, the former guitarist for the Red Hot Chili Peppers. What do you think about the band’s new album? 

It’s a case of: They should keep writing music and keep doing it. They do what they do and I don’t think it’s really about whether it’s good or not, in a really weird way. It’s good to me, 100 percent, because I know their intention behind it. But I know them ― or I know a couple of them more than others. I know where they’re coming from so I feel like that’s what matters to me.

It’s not music I listen to, but I think that Flea is an incredible artist, in general, and he’s an incredible bass player obviously ― which is who he is and the way he lives his life. I know there’s intention and there’s integrity behind what he’s doing.

This interview has been edited and condensed for length and clarity.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Everyone Thinks This Is Lady Gaga’s Character In ‘American Horror Story’

American Horror Story: Roanope.

The sixth season of FX’s horror anthology is turning out to be one of its creepiest yet, thanks to an abundance of jump scares, bloody knives and spirits who put horrible thoughts in kids’ heads.

In the second episode, Matt and Shelby stupidly decide not to leave their obviously demonic house just because they’d lose their life savings, evidently more important than their actual lives. The police finally witness something strange on the property ― although you’d think they would already know the place was haunted due to (presumably) decades of weird goings-on. Lee’s young daughter, Flora, talks to a ghost who says she wants to make “the blood” stop and tries to strike a deal with someone named Priscilla. Priscilla, naturally, wants to kill the whole family.

Perhaps the strangest part of the whole episode, though, was Kathy Bates’ scene. As some kind of cult priestess, Bates puts a pig’s head on a man and roasts him over a fire. 

But appearing next to Bates, hunched and wild-eyed, adorned with a crown of antlers, smeared with the ashes of a thousand ritual sacrifices and draped in what may be a burlap sack is ― maybe, at long last, just maybe ― Lady Gaga. 

Lady Gaga is snatching weaves! #AHSRoanoke pic.twitter.com/YjiEbt19sa

— #PERFECTILLUSION (@stevenartpop) September 22, 2016

At least, that’s what fans across the internet believe. 

Get you a girl that can do both #AHS #AHSRoanoke pic.twitter.com/MtleKbE5KR

— Lady Gaga (@NYCLadyGaga) September 22, 2016

Lady Gaga agora pouco no segundo episódio da sexta temporada de AHS.
Assista: https://t.co/JQ2YG2kiKFpic.twitter.com/9XCjx5EKx7

— RDT Lady Gaga (@RDTLadyGaga) September 22, 2016

Lady Gaga’s debut on #MyRoanokeNightmare? #AHS6 pic.twitter.com/AWRrcOY2t3

— AmericanHorrorStory (@RoanokeAHS) September 22, 2016

We’ll have to wait to find out for sure.

“American Horror Story: Roanoke” airs at 10 p.m. Wednesdays on FX.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

American Horror Story: Roanope.

The sixth season of FX’s horror anthology is turning out to be one of its creepiest yet, thanks to an abundance of jump scares, bloody knives and spirits who put horrible thoughts in kids’ heads.

In the second episode, Matt and Shelby stupidly decide not to leave their obviously demonic house just because they’d lose their life savings, evidently more important than their actual lives. The police finally witness something strange on the property ― although you’d think they would already know the place was haunted due to (presumably) decades of weird goings-on. Lee’s young daughter, Flora, talks to a ghost who says she wants to make “the blood” stop and tries to strike a deal with someone named Priscilla. Priscilla, naturally, wants to kill the whole family.

Perhaps the strangest part of the whole episode, though, was Kathy Bates’ scene. As some kind of cult priestess, Bates puts a pig’s head on a man and roasts him over a fire. 

But appearing next to Bates, hunched and wild-eyed, adorned with a crown of antlers, smeared with the ashes of a thousand ritual sacrifices and draped in what may be a burlap sack is ― maybe, at long last, just maybe ― Lady Gaga. 

At least, that’s what fans across the internet believe. 

We’ll have to wait to find out for sure.

“American Horror Story: Roanoke” airs at 10 p.m. Wednesdays on FX.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.