Trevor Noah: Obama’s Smile Looks Like He’s ‘About To Go Insane’

#CinnamonHitler https://t.co/tFRlQhzW18https://t.co/woODBIaCoj— The Daily Show (@TheDailyShow) July 29, 2016

Trevor Noah is confident that President Barack Obama will be remembered long after his term officially ends in January. If n…

Trevor Noah is confident that President Barack Obama will be remembered long after his term officially ends in January. If not for his policies, then for the frequent touching of his own face.

“The Daily Show” host noticed the president’s hands-on approach on Wednesday during his speech at the Democratic National Convention.

Before the speech, there was a short film discussing the major events of Obama’s two terms in office. The video left its mark on Noah, but not in the way Democratic Party officials might like.

“You realize after watching that video … how much more than any other president in this country’s history Barack Obama has touched his face,” Noah said.

A brief look at HuffPost photo libraries revealed Noah is right: Obama does touch his face a lot, as this gallery shows.

Noah also saw some other things on the president’s face, besides his own fingers, during the DNC speech.

“You see that smile?” Noah said. “That’s not joy. That’s the laugh of someone who’s about to go insane.”

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

PEAK – S3 Ep.16

Updated every Friday
Copyright ⓒ 2015 RollingStory Inc.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.





Updated every Friday


Copyright ⓒ 2015 RollingStory Inc.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Not So Sunny Day: ‘Sesame Street’ Axes 3 Beloved Cast Members

Can you tell me how to get… how to get to the unemployment office? 

“Sesame Street” is getting rid of three beloved characters, along with the human actors who play them. Bob McGrath (”Bob”), Emilio Delgado (“Luis”) and Roscoe Orman (“Gordon”) have all been let go, Sesame Workshop said in a statement on Facebook, adding that the trio would “continue to represent us at public events.” 

“To us, and for millions of people worldwide, they are a treasured part of Sesame Street. Since the show began, we are constantly evolving our content and curriculum, and hence, our characters, to meet the educational needs of children. As a result of this, our cast has changed over the years, though you can still expect to see many of them in upcoming productions.”

McGrath first broke the news at Florida Supercon earlier this month.

I have completed my 45th season this year,” he said on The MuppetCast podcast. “They let all of the original cast members go, with the exception of Alan Muraoka ― who is probably 20 years younger than the rest of us ― and Chris Knowings, who is also young.” 

 

(Story continues below video)

McGrath, 84, has been on the show since it debuted in 1969, according to USA Today. Delgado, 76, was added in 1971, while 72-year-old Orman joined in 1974.

The casting changes follow the show’s switch from an hourlong format to a 30-minutes. New episodes will air first on HBO and be rebroadcast nine months later on PBS. However, a statement from the show said the decision to dismiss the veteran cast members wasn’t made by HBO.

“Sesame Workshop retains sole creative control over the show,” the organization said on Facebook. “HBO does not oversee the production.”

PBS also said it had nothing to do with the casting changes.

“’Sesame Street’ is produced by Sesame Workshop, which is an independent production company, and the casting decision was made by them,” PBS president and CEO Paula Kerger said, according to The Wrap. “We did not know about it beforehand. We found out about it after.” 

The news came just one year after another longtime member of the cast, Sonia Manzano, retired. She had portrayed the character of Maria since 1971.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Can you tell me how to get… how to get to the unemployment office? 

“Sesame Street” is getting rid of three beloved characters, along with the human actors who play them. Bob McGrath (”Bob”), Emilio Delgado (“Luis”) and Roscoe Orman (“Gordon”) have all been let go, Sesame Workshop said in a statement on Facebook, adding that the trio would “continue to represent us at public events.” 

“To us, and for millions of people worldwide, they are a treasured part of Sesame Street. Since the show began, we are constantly evolving our content and curriculum, and hence, our characters, to meet the educational needs of children. As a result of this, our cast has changed over the years, though you can still expect to see many of them in upcoming productions.”

McGrath first broke the news at Florida Supercon earlier this month.

I have completed my 45th season this year,” he said on The MuppetCast podcast. “They let all of the original cast members go, with the exception of Alan Muraoka ― who is probably 20 years younger than the rest of us ― and Chris Knowings, who is also young.” 

 

(Story continues below video)

McGrath, 84, has been on the show since it debuted in 1969, according to USA Today. Delgado, 76, was added in 1971, while 72-year-old Orman joined in 1974.

The casting changes follow the show’s switch from an hourlong format to a 30-minutes. New episodes will air first on HBO and be rebroadcast nine months later on PBS. However, a statement from the show said the decision to dismiss the veteran cast members wasn’t made by HBO.

“Sesame Workshop retains sole creative control over the show,” the organization said on Facebook. “HBO does not oversee the production.”

PBS also said it had nothing to do with the casting changes.

“’Sesame Street’ is produced by Sesame Workshop, which is an independent production company, and the casting decision was made by them,” PBS president and CEO Paula Kerger said, according to The Wrap. “We did not know about it beforehand. We found out about it after.” 

The news came just one year after another longtime member of the cast, Sonia Manzano, retired. She had portrayed the character of Maria since 1971.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Hillary Clinton Decides The World Is Wide Enough For Both ‘Hamilton’ And The Rest Of Her Speech

It’s 2016 and she was talking about the founding fathers, so Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton had to do it. She was not willing to wait for it. She could not throw away her shot. 

She name-checked “Hamilton.” 

“Though ‘we may not live to see the glory,’ as the song from the musical ‘Hamilton’ goes, ‘let us gladly join the fight,’” Clinton said in her speech at the Democratic National Convention on Thursday. “Let our legacy be about ‘planting seeds in a garden you never get to see.’”

Lin-Manuel Miranda, who created and starred in the Tony Award-winning musical, seemed pleased. 

I’m with her.#AndShesBeenListeningToDiscTwo!

— Lin-Manuel Miranda (@Lin_Manuel) July 29, 2016

https://t.co/HAA68RqJAk

— Lin-Manuel Miranda (@Lin_Manuel) July 29, 2016

Okay.
Bit of a night.
Back to vacation! pic.twitter.com/4SLAt5EPqy

— Lin-Manuel Miranda (@Lin_Manuel) July 29, 2016

Clinton has seen the Broadway show multiple times, and the Hillary Victory Fund held a $2,700-per-seat fundraiser there earlier this month. 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

It’s 2016 and she was talking about the founding fathers, so Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton had to do it. She was not willing to wait for it. She could not throw away her shot. 

She name-checked “Hamilton.” 

“Though ‘we may not live to see the glory,’ as the song from the musical ‘Hamilton’ goes, ‘let us gladly join the fight,’” Clinton said in her speech at the Democratic National Convention on Thursday. “Let our legacy be about ‘planting seeds in a garden you never get to see.’”

Lin-Manuel Miranda, who created and starred in the Tony Award-winning musical, seemed pleased. 

Clinton has seen the Broadway show multiple times, and the Hillary Victory Fund held a $2,700-per-seat fundraiser there earlier this month. 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Shonda Rhimes And Morgan Freeman Help Share Hillary Clinton’s Inspiring Story

A video detailing Hillary Clinton’s life and career played just before the presidential nominee took the stage at the 2016 Democratic National Convention on Thursday night.

President Barack Obama and former President Bill Clinton were both interviewed for the film, which was narrated by actor Morgan Freeman and produced by Shonda Rhimes and Betsy Beers.

“It is an honor to provide America with an intimate portrait of Hillary,” Rhimes said in a statement. “Everyone already knows the powerhouse ― now, with this piece, everyone will also get to know the person.”

Watch the video above.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

A video detailing Hillary Clinton’s life and career played just before the presidential nominee took the stage at the 2016 Democratic National Convention on Thursday night.

President Barack Obama and former President Bill Clinton were both interviewed for the film, which was narrated by actor Morgan Freeman and produced by Shonda Rhimes and Betsy Beers.

“It is an honor to provide America with an intimate portrait of Hillary,” Rhimes said in a statement. “Everyone already knows the powerhouse ― now, with this piece, everyone will also get to know the person.”

Watch the video above.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Joe Biden Will Appear On ‘Law & Order: Special Victims Unit’

Coming soon to your television set (or later to your Netflix binge): Vice President Joe Biden.

He’ll tape an appearance Friday on “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit,” the popular and long-running procedural drama that focuses on sex crimes. Biden’s appearance will focus on the backlog of untested rape kits, according to the White House.

Combating violence against women has been one of the top issues of Biden’s political career. During his time as a senator from Delaware, he introduced the Violence Against Women Act, which eventually passed in 1994, and as vice president he has been involved in efforts to stop campus sexual assaults.

Biden has collaborated with “Law & Order: SVU” star Mariska Hargitay on advocacy efforts several times in the past. The two visited a domestic violence hotline together in 2013 and co-starred in a 2014 public service announcement. Hargitay narrated the video that played before Biden’s Democratic National Convention speech on Wednesday. 

Biden announced plans last fall to award nearly $80 million in grants toward eliminating the backlog of untested rape kits, in a combined effort between the federal government and the New York County District Attorney’s office. Rape kits are containers that include information and specimens, such as blood samples and swabs, gathered in an exam after a sexual assault.

DNA evidence is often critical to prosecuting sex crimes, but more than 100,000 rape kits have never been tested, according to RAINN, an anti-sexual violence organization. In some states, they can be thrown in the trash, and no state gives a victim the right to retain a rape kit until the statute of limitations is up on the alleged crime.

Hargitay founded the Joyful Heart Foundation, which works with survivors of sexual and domestic violence. The organization gave Biden an award earlier this year for his work on the issues.

“When I wrote the Violence Against Women Act over 20 years ago, domestic violence was considered a private matter,” Biden said after receiving the award. “There was no hotline or special-victims units, and the legal system and public opinion routinely re-victimized the victim. I became convinced that if we pulled back the mask on this epidemic that occurred in the country, we can begin to not only change the laws, but we could change lives.”

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Coming soon to your television set (or later to your Netflix binge): Vice President Joe Biden.

He’ll tape an appearance Friday on “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit,” the popular and long-running procedural drama that focuses on sex crimes. Biden’s appearance will focus on the backlog of untested rape kits, according to the White House.

Combating violence against women has been one of the top issues of Biden’s political career. During his time as a senator from Delaware, he introduced the Violence Against Women Act, which eventually passed in 1994, and as vice president he has been involved in efforts to stop campus sexual assaults.

Biden has collaborated with “Law & Order: SVU” star Mariska Hargitay on advocacy efforts several times in the past. The two visited a domestic violence hotline together in 2013 and co-starred in a 2014 public service announcement. Hargitay narrated the video that played before Biden’s Democratic National Convention speech on Wednesday. 

Biden announced plans last fall to award nearly $80 million in grants toward eliminating the backlog of untested rape kits, in a combined effort between the federal government and the New York County District Attorney’s office. Rape kits are containers that include information and specimens, such as blood samples and swabs, gathered in an exam after a sexual assault.

DNA evidence is often critical to prosecuting sex crimes, but more than 100,000 rape kits have never been tested, according to RAINN, an anti-sexual violence organization. In some states, they can be thrown in the trash, and no state gives a victim the right to retain a rape kit until the statute of limitations is up on the alleged crime.

Hargitay founded the Joyful Heart Foundation, which works with survivors of sexual and domestic violence. The organization gave Biden an award earlier this year for his work on the issues.

“When I wrote the Violence Against Women Act over 20 years ago, domestic violence was considered a private matter,” Biden said after receiving the award. “There was no hotline or special-victims units, and the legal system and public opinion routinely re-victimized the victim. I became convinced that if we pulled back the mask on this epidemic that occurred in the country, we can begin to not only change the laws, but we could change lives.”

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

<i>Hamilton’s America</i>: A Ticket You Can Afford. Heck, a Ticket You Can Get

Alex Horwitz figured out how to get tickets to Hamilton, the hottest show on Broadway.

He directed a documentary called Hamilton’s America, which weaves the life of the real Alexander Hamilton into the story of the contemporary stage phenomenon. He …

Alex Horwitz figured out how to get tickets to Hamilton, the hottest show on Broadway.

2016-07-29-1469755556-159139-hamilton2.jpg

He directed a documentary called Hamilton’s America, which weaves the life of the real Alexander Hamilton into the story of the contemporary stage phenomenon. He sold the documentary to PBS, where it will premiere Oct. 21.

And it worked. He saw the show.

Why didn’t we think of that?

“Yes, that is why I made it,” jokes Horwitz, a New York screenwriter whose previous TV work included editing productions on the notorious Whitey Bulger and Nicki Minaj. More seriously, he admits, he has gotten “far too many” ticket requests from friends, casual acquaintances and total strangers who heard he now had a connection.

But in a sense, he says, Hamilton’s America may help ease the frustration of all those people who can’t acquire or can’t afford tickets to Hamilton creator Lin-Manuel Miranda’s live show at the Richard Rodgers Theater.

2016-07-29-1469755689-3154371-hamilton3.jpeg

“We give you some of the Hamilton experience,” he says, “and maybe that will help tide you over until next year, when the situation should ease a little. There will be at least two touring companies and it will open in London.”

At the same time, he says, Hamilton’s America “will give you some things that audiences won’t see at the Richard Rodgers.

“Because we’ve got more time, we can explore Hamilton a little more fully than Lin can do in the show. We can also show you the reaction of the current President, and his family, after the show was performed at the White House.”

What he personally took from his three-year immersion in Hamilton’s life, says Horwitz, is that “Hamilton was a fascinating and incredibly important figure.

“He was brilliant. He was fiery. He had some great ideas. He also had some terrible ideas.

“But that’s true of most of the Founding Fathers. They were big personalities. They were loud. They argued. They said despicable things about each other. They behaved admirably and yet many of them owned slaves.

“Hamilton was involved with all of them, of course. This film touches on George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr, but there were so many others we just didn’t have room to include. It could have been a 10-part miniseries, because there’s that much material in Hamilton’s life.”

The idea he says, “was to make a film about politics that’s not political. We’re neutral. We want to show his life, the good and the flaws. We’re also making two movies at once, since we’re showing the making of Lin’s Broadway production at the same time. It’s kind of a perfect storm.”

2016-07-29-1469755781-7177346-hamilton1.jpg

After three years, Horwitz (above) admits he’s ready for a rest from Hamilton, though he won’t rule out returning to that world in the future.

And incidentally, back to the ticket thing, he says the popularity of Hamilton could mark an interesting shift in the whole role of Broadway theater and music.

“Theater used to be popular culture,” he says. “Back around the turn of the 20th century, the highest aspiration was to be an opera star.

“Then the movies came along and people wanted to be movie stars,” and live theater gradually lost its place as everyday entertainment for the masses. For most people, it became a once-in-a-while thing, an occasional break from the movies or, later, television.

“But for a long time,” Horwitz points out, “stage music was still our popular music, the top-40 of its day. With Hamilton, maybe we’re seeing things go back toward that a little bit.”

Even if you can’t get a ticket to the show. Yet.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Newspaper Explains Use Of MJ Crying Face For Story About Gun Violence

The Michael Jordan Crying Face has become perhaps the most well-known sports meme of our time. Whenever there is sadness, the Michael Jordan Crying Face is not far behind. It has been the subject of think pieces in The New Yorker and The New York Times. It has its own Wikipedia page. It just won’t go away. 

Even when Jordan does a good deed, like finally speaking out against police brutality and donating $2 million to help advance police-community relations, he apparently can’t escape his own tears. On Wednesday, a photo of a newspaper article in Malawi went viral, and it wasn’t hard to understand why: the article was about Jordan’s recent personal essay on violence, but the accompanying photo was, well … It was the Michael Jordan Crying Face.

Lmaoooooooooo Malawian newspaper really used that pic of all pics. Ati “photograph BBC” Dead dead dead pic.twitter.com/kPIXMoGqbf

— Ballz (@daliballz) July 27, 2016

Amused Twitter users from Malawi posted the image multiple times on Wednesday, and within hours, Bleacher Report, Sports Illustrated and CBS Sports had all written about it, expressing disbelief that a newspaper would choose such a photo for such an article, as well as skepticism about whether it was real.

We wanted to find out more. Which newspaper? Why that photo? Are they in on the joke? Or did Jordan’s tears genuinely touch — rather than amuse — the photo editor in charge? These are pressing questions in need of concrete answers. 

With the assistance of Malawian Twitter user @Zosavuta, The Huffington Post tracked down the newspaper. The helpful Twitter user provided us with additional images from Wednesday’s edition of the newspaper to identify the East African outlet.

As it turns out, the newspaper is called The Nation, or The Malawi Nation. When reached for comment on Thursday afternoon, The Nation Senior News Analyst Joy Ndovi stated that using the Michael Jordan Crying meme was intentional, and said Sports Editor Garry Chirwa picked the photo.

Here’s Ndovi’s full explanation:

The article on Jordan reacting to the violence in U.S. was just the perfect one for the meme to be used. It depicts the emotional state of the former NBA star. Though it might seem unconventional, what other photo could be more suitable than the infamous Crying Jordan meme?

Got it. 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

The Michael Jordan Crying Face has become perhaps the most well-known sports meme of our time. Whenever there is sadness, the Michael Jordan Crying Face is not far behind. It has been the subject of think pieces in The New Yorker and The New York Times. It has its own Wikipedia page. It just won’t go away. 

Even when Jordan does a good deed, like finally speaking out against police brutality and donating $2 million to help advance police-community relations, he apparently can’t escape his own tears. On Wednesday, a photo of a newspaper article in Malawi went viral, and it wasn’t hard to understand why: the article was about Jordan’s recent personal essay on violence, but the accompanying photo was, well … It was the Michael Jordan Crying Face.

Amused Twitter users from Malawi posted the image multiple times on Wednesday, and within hours, Bleacher Report, Sports Illustrated and CBS Sports had all written about it, expressing disbelief that a newspaper would choose such a photo for such an article, as well as skepticism about whether it was real.

We wanted to find out more. Which newspaper? Why that photo? Are they in on the joke? Or did Jordan’s tears genuinely touch — rather than amuse — the photo editor in charge? These are pressing questions in need of concrete answers. 

With the assistance of Malawian Twitter user @Zosavuta, The Huffington Post tracked down the newspaper. The helpful Twitter user provided us with additional images from Wednesday’s edition of the newspaper to identify the East African outlet.

As it turns out, the newspaper is called The Nation, or The Malawi Nation. When reached for comment on Thursday afternoon, The Nation Senior News Analyst Joy Ndovi stated that using the Michael Jordan Crying meme was intentional, and said Sports Editor Garry Chirwa picked the photo.

Here’s Ndovi’s full explanation:

The article on Jordan reacting to the violence in U.S. was just the perfect one for the meme to be used. It depicts the emotional state of the former NBA star. Though it might seem unconventional, what other photo could be more suitable than the infamous Crying Jordan meme?

Got it. 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.