Apple releases iOS 11.0.2 with a fix for crackling audio on iPhone 8

 If you just bought an iPhone 8 or iPhone 8 Plus, you may have encountered a rather annoying issue. Some new iPhone users could hear crackling sound during calls. Apple just released iOS 11.0.2, which includes a handful of bug fixes, including a fix for this bug. Many users have been reporting crackling noise ever since the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus came out. A colleague also noticed the same… Read More

Engadget giveaway: Win an iPhone 8 or 8 Plus courtesy of Caseology!

I've seen enough Candy Crush players skimming their fingers over fractured displays to know that if you've snagged one of Apple's new iPhone 8 handsets, a case is highly recommended. That's why Caseology has launched a new line of phone protection mo…

Tim Cook Rises and Eddy Cue Drops on Vanity Fair’s 2017 New Establishment List

Vanity Fair released its annual New Establishment List this week, which it has described as the top 100 so-called “Silicon Valley hotshots, Hollywood moguls, Wall Street titans, and cultural icons,” and two Apple executives made the cut.

Apple CEO Tim Cook rose to third overall, up from 11th in the year-ago list. Apple’s services chief Eddy Cue, who recently ceded Siri leadership to software engineering chief Craig Federighi, dropped from 54th to 73rd.

Cook’s description:

CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT

With a market cap north of $800 billion, Apple is on track to be a trillion-dollar company.

RARE DISPLAY OF MORTALITY

As consumers reject the new MacBook Pro and Apple arrives late to the game with HomePod, an Echo wannabe, the company is clinging to the iPhone for more than half of its revenue—an inauspicious strategy, since phone sales are predicted to decline.

MORTIFYING TRUMP MOMENT

Cook showed up at Trump Tower in December to kiss the ring, then went to the White House in June to try to convince Trump of the importance of coding in schools.

Cue’s description:

CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT

Launching HomePod, Apple’s voice-activated virtual assistant. The product, a competitor to Amazon’s Echo, may be the new hit Apple so desperately needs as interest in the iPhone wanes.

RARE DISPLAY OF MORTALITY

Planet of the Apps, Apple’s foray into original programming under Cue, “feels like something that was developed at a cocktail party,” according to one review.

Laurene Powell Jobs, co-founder of educational and philanthropic organization Emerson Collective, rose from 73rd to 44th.

Powell Jobs gained a majority stake in The Atlantic in July, and she’s also reportedly investing in Monumental Sports & Entertainment, the owner of several Washington D.C. area sports teams. She is the widow of the late Steve Jobs.

Professional wrestler turned actor Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, who starred in an extended Siri ad this year, broke in at 37th.

Vanity Fair’s fourth annual New Establishment Summit is underway this week at the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts in Beverly Hills, California. There, so-called “titans” of technology, media, business, entertainment, politics, and the arts discuss issues and innovations shaping the future.

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YouTube iOS App Updated With iMessage Support for Easily Sharing Videos

The YouTube iOS app today was updated to version 12.38, bringing a swipe-to-remove gesture for videos in playlists, as well as introducing support for iMessage. After updating the app you should see YouTube appear as a new icon in your Messages app drawer, and after tapping on it you can scroll to view your recently-watched videos, search YouTube for a specific video, and tap to send it to a friend.



After sharing the video, YouTube links work the same as they did before, with the ability to watch the videos directly within Messages without having to leave the app, but there is a new player for content sent through the Messages app. You can tap on a video and it will open up into a full-screen player with playback controls, a watch later button, recommended videos, and an “open app” button to jump directly to YouTube.

Prior to today’s update, to share a YouTube video in Messages you had to find it in the YouTube app, tap the share button, choose Messages, and then type in a contact. You could also copy the video link and paste it into the text message field within Messages.

Check out our guide on iOS 11’s Messages app drawer redesign if you aren’t familiar with navigating the updated section of Apple’s texting app.

Tag: YouTube

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Yoink for Mac Updated With Clipboard Support

Eternal Storms Software today updated its popular drag and drop Mac app Yoink with several improvements, including clipboard support.



Mac users can now add the contents of their clipboard to Yoink by opening the app’s dropdown menu from the menu bar and clicking “Add from Clipboard.” If you copy an image from a website, for example, you can essentially paste it into Yoink and it will appear as a TIFF file that can be dragged and dropped.



Alongside clipboard support, PopClip can now be integrated with Yoink after installing a plugin in the app’s advanced preferences.

Yoink 3.4 has improved compatibility with several apps, including Messages and Mail on macOS High Sierra, Parallels, ForkLift, Keka, Horos, and JPEGmini. The update also fixes a bug in macOS High Sierra where performing a dragging gesture would sometimes result in files being selected in Yoink.

Yoink, first released in 2011, is a popular drag and drop helper for Mac. When you drag a file, the app pops open along the edge of the screen as a convenient place to drop the file. Yoink will hold on to the files you drag into it until you drag them out again, freeing up your mouse to navigate more easily.

Yoink 3.1


Yoink 3.4 is available now on the Mac App Store [Direct Link] as a free update for existing users. The app costs $6.99 for new users.

Tags: Mac apps, Yoink

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‘Nuraphone’ Adapts to Your Ears and Automatically Adjusts Music Playback for Better Quality Audio

The Nura headphones were funded on Kickstarter last year, surpassing a $100,000 goal and earning around $1.8 million from backers who were interested in the device’s personal music calibration abilities. Today, the company is officially launching the $399 “Nuraphone” to backers from the Kickstarter campaign and to any new buyer through its website, with a pair of headphones that use a self-learning engine to automatically adjust to your own “unique hearing” and ensure each song you listen to is the highest quality possible (via The Verge).

Nuraphone plays a range of tones into your ear, measuring a faint sound that your ear generates in response to the tones, and this process begins the calibration of the headphones to your own profile. The returning sound is “encoded” with data about how well you heard the noise that entered your ear, with the device’s self-learning engine analyzing the information and creating a custom “hearing profile” with a unique color and shape. All of this happens in approximately 60 seconds.

Images via The Verge


Once your hearing profile is in shape, Nuraphone filters all music playback through your profile settings to “sonically mold” and adjust songs and deliver a greater degree of detail. Nura CEO Kyle Slater told The Verge that the Nuraphone is meant to “do for your ears what glasses do for your eyes.”

Kyle Slater, Nura’s CEO, compares what the Nuraphones do for your ears to what glasses do for your eyes. They’re supposed to figure out which frequencies of sound you’re good at and not so good at hearing, and then mess with the amplification so that you hear every song precisely how it was mixed. “We assume that we all hear the same,” Slater says. “Hearing offers no point of comparison like vision does.” Our hearing gradually degrades as we age (and listen to loud music…), so it’s reasonable to think a lot of people could use this

Once connected to an iPhone or Android smartphone through Bluetooth (the headphones also support Lightning, USB-C, micro-USB, and 3.5mm analog cables), Nuraphone can begin playing and adjusting songs to your hearing profile. Nura has decided to use a proprietary charging cable, meaning to use any of these wired connections you’ll have to buy extra accessories from the company (one USB cable is included in the box).



The headphone’s design is that of an over-ear headphone mixed with in-ear buds, and on the outside there is a programmable touch panel for controlling features like playing and pausing songs.

A few sites have gotten to go hands-on and review Nuraphone, mostly coming to the consensus that Nura has taken a unique approach to designing headphones and providing a new user experience, but the first iteration of the product is still lacking. The Verge pointed out that someone with hearing issues could see great benefits from using Nuraphone, “but the end result isn’t as revolutionary as the general idea.”

But my initial impression is that the sound improvement isn’t night and day over other pricey headphones. Maybe the difference would be larger for someone who Nura detected more hearing issues with — though there’s no way of telling whether Nura is doing a little or a lot for me. (I tried listening to high-pitched sounds that I can’t or can barely hear, but Nura didn’t seem to help me hear them substantially better.) I like the effect the headphones create when playing music, but the end result isn’t as revolutionary as the general idea.

TechRadar mentioned that the fundamentals for a quality set of headphones are there, but the “benefits of sound personalization are subtle” and the user experience is sometimes “over complicated.” Despite a few design quirks, Engadget called the headphones “impressive” and “polished,” saying that that they will “likely only get better” through software updates.

Nuraphone is available to purchase today on Nura’s website for $399, including a case for the headphones and a USB charging cable.

Tag: Nuraphone

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LG Screen Manager App for UltraFine Displays Updated for macOS High Sierra

Alongside its UltraFine 4K and 5K displays developed in partnership with Apple, LG offers an LG Screen Manager app for Mac that serves to manage various functions of the display, including handling firmware updates for the display itself, accessing windowing features such as automatic splitting of the desktop into up to four sections, and more. LG Screen Manager includes a menu item for quick access to its desktop splitting features, as well as a full app for more advanced features.



Recently, LG released an updated version of LG Screen Manager for macOS High Sierra, ensuring compatibility with the latest Mac operating system and debuting a new notification system that will automatically alert you whenever there are updates for your display.

In addition to the new compatibility and update notifications, the latest update to LG Screen Manager includes tweaks and enhancements for the display firmware that were rolled out earlier this summer. Among those tweaks is fine tuning of the volume curve, which addresses some early complaints about the volume control not being fine enough at the low end of the range with a significant increase in volume between even the first and second levels. The new volume curve allows for much finer adjustment at the low end.

Other features in the display firmware update include improvements to low-light performance of the camera and better compatibility for devices connected to the three downstream USB-C ports on the rear of the display.

The updated LG Screen Manager app, version 2.08, is available for download from LG’s support site.

Tag: LG

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Philips Extends HomeKit Support to Hue Tap, Dimmer Switch, and Motion Sensor

Philips today extended support for Apple’s HomeKit platform to the Hue Tap switch, Hue dimmer switch, and Hue motion sensor.



The trio of Hue accessories can now be controlled with Apple’s Home app on iOS 10 or later, and configured as part of HomeKit scenes.

Philips Hue is extending its Apple HomeKit compatibility for Hue accessories: Hue tap, Hue dimmer switch and Hue motion sensor. Meaning with a press of a button, or movement of your body, you can activate your favorite Apple Home app scenes. To set up automations, you need an Apple TV (4th generation) with tvOS 10 or an iPad with iOS 10 or later.

The compatibility was added in an update to the Philips Hue app for iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch, available now on the App Store [Direct Link].

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