Pea plants demonstrate ability to ‘gamble’ — a first in plants

An international team of scientists from Oxford University, UK, and Tel-Hai College, Israel, has shown that pea plants can demonstrate sensitivity to risk – namely, that they can make adaptive choices that take into account environmental variance, an a…

An international team of scientists from Oxford University, UK, and Tel-Hai College, Israel, has shown that pea plants can demonstrate sensitivity to risk – namely, that they can make adaptive choices that take into account environmental variance, an ability previously unknown outside the animal kingdom.

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In times of great famine, microalgae digest themselves

Bremerhaven/Germany, June 30th, 2016. In a recent study, scientists of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have determined the molecular mechanisms which microalgae apply in order to switch from rapid cel…

Bremerhaven/Germany, June 30th, 2016. In a recent study, scientists of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have determined the molecular mechanisms which microalgae apply in order to switch from rapid cell division to growth-arrest during times of acute nutrient deficiency. In laboratory experiments, the scientists have been able to observe that calcifying microalgae in a state of nutrient deficiency initially tweak their metabolism to be more economic and efficient before, out of necessity, they even partially digest themselves. The molecular switches for these basic functions of cells are strikingly similar in all living things. Apparently, it is these switches, which, when malfunctioning in humans, cause cells to lose control of their division activity and potentially become cancer cells. The new findings are being published online this week in the journal Frontiers of Marine Science.

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Fruit flies adjust to sudden drops in temperature; just keep buzzing about the fruit bowl

Fruit flies may seem simple, but these common visitors to the fruit bowl can drastically alter their gene expression and metabolism to respond to temperature changes in their environment, an international team of researchers have shown.
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Fruit flies may seem simple, but these common visitors to the fruit bowl can drastically alter their gene expression and metabolism to respond to temperature changes in their environment, an international team of researchers have shown.

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Scientists observe first signs of healing in the Antarctic ozone layer

Scientists at MIT and elsewhere have identified the “first fingerprints of healing” of the Antarctic ozone layer, published today in the journal Science.
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Scientists at MIT and elsewhere have identified the “first fingerprints of healing” of the Antarctic ozone layer, published today in the journal Science.

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Wireless, wearable toxic-gas detector

MIT researchers have developed low-cost chemical sensors, made from chemically altered carbon nanotubes, that enable smartphones or other wireless devices to detect trace amounts of toxic gases.
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MIT researchers have developed low-cost chemical sensors, made from chemically altered carbon nanotubes, that enable smartphones or other wireless devices to detect trace amounts of toxic gases.

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Boost needed to keep world below 2°C or 1.5°C: Study

The latest comprehensive analysis of national plans to address climate change after 2020 shows the world will not reach its target of keeping warming to below 2C off pre-industrial levels.
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The latest comprehensive analysis of national plans to address climate change after 2020 shows the world will not reach its target of keeping warming to below 2C off pre-industrial levels.

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Facebook gives friends higher priority in News Feeds

Facebook is to give posts by users’ friends and family greater prominence – a move that may challenge professional publishers.

Facebook is to give posts by users’ friends and family greater prominence – a move that may challenge professional publishers.

Robot salamander can walk and swim

A robot salamander that mimics the movement of the real thing is developed in Switzerland.

A robot salamander that mimics the movement of the real thing is developed in Switzerland.