Customers ‘bewildered and fearful’ about use of their data

Nine in 10 people have no idea what companies do with the personal information the firms hold about them, says the Chartered Institute of Marketing.

Nine in 10 people have no idea what companies do with the personal information the firms hold about them, says the Chartered Institute of Marketing.

Maps to help drivers find parking spaces

Audi, BMW and Mercedes Benz cars fitted with on-board sensors are to share information in real-time about on-street parking spaces and road works via a digital map service.

Audi, BMW and Mercedes Benz cars fitted with on-board sensors are to share information in real-time about on-street parking spaces and road works via a digital map service.

iTunes Backup Passwords ‘Much Easier’ to Crack in iOS 10, Apple Working on Fix

iOS 10 uses a new password verification mechanism for iTunes backups that makes them easier to crack, according to testing performed by Elcomsoft, a company that specializes in software designed to access iPhone data.

Encrypted iTunes backups create…

iOS 10 uses a new password verification mechanism for iTunes backups that makes them easier to crack, according to testing performed by Elcomsoft, a company that specializes in software designed to access iPhone data.

Encrypted iTunes backups created on a Mac or PC are protected by a password that can potentially be brute forced by password cracking software. The backup method in iOS 10 “skips certain security checks,” allowing Elcomsoft to try backup passwords “approximately 2500 times faster” compared to iOS 9 and earlier operating systems.

ios10

Obtaining the password for an iTunes backup provides access to all data on the phone, including that stored in Keychain, which holds all of a user’s passwords and other sensitive information.

At this time, we have an early implementation featuring CPU-only recovery. The new security check is approximately 2,500 times weaker compared to the old one that was used in iOS 9 backups. At this time, we are getting these speeds:

iOS 9 (CPU): 2,400 passwords per second (Intel i5)

iOS 9 (GPU): 150,000 passwords per second (NVIDIA GTX 1080)

iOS 10 (CPU): 6,000,000 passwords per second (Intel i5)

In specific terms, security analyst Per Thorsheim of Peerlyst says Apple has switched from using a PBKDF2 hashing algorithm with 10,000 iterations to using a SHA256 algorithm with a single iteration, allowing for a significant speed increase when brute forcing a password.

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Image via Peerlyst


In a statement given to Forbes, Apple confirmed it is aware of the issue and is working on a fix.
“We’re aware of an issue that affects the encryption strength for backups of devices on iOS 10 when backing up to iTunes on the Mac or PC. We are addressing this issue in an upcoming security update. This does not affect iCloud backups,” a spokesperson said. “We recommend users ensure their Mac or PC are protected with strong passwords and can only be accessed by authorized users. Additional security is also available with FileVault whole disk encryption.”

As Apple points out, this security oversight is limited to backups created on a Mac or PC and does not affect the security of iCloud backups. Most users likely do not need to worry about this issue as it requires access to the Mac or PC that was used to make the backup.

Apple has updates for iOS 10 and macOS Sierra in the works, and it’s possible a fix will be included in the new versions of the software. iOS 10.1 and macOS Sierra 10.12.1 were seeded to developers and public beta testers earlier this week.

Related Roundup: iOS 10

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Snapchat Announces ‘Spectacles,’ $130 Sunglasses That Record 10 Seconds of Video at a Time

Snapchat has announced its first hardware product, a one-size-fits-all pair of sunglasses called Spectacles that can record 10 seconds of video at a time, reports The Wall Street Journal. The glasses will cost $130 and launch this fall in three colors: teal, black and coral. Video will sync wirelessly to a paired iPhone or other smartphone.

spectaclesSnap CEO Evan Spiegel in Spectacles, Photo by The WSJ

The glasses record when you tap a button near the hinge, and each tap records 10 seconds of video footage from its 115-degree-angle lens. The lens was designed to be wider than smartphone cameras, more closely mirroring the natural view of human eyes. The video is recorded in a circular format, as Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel argues that the square and rectangle form that photos and videos currently come in are a vestige of early photos being printed on paper.

Snapchat has been developing Spectacles for years, and Spiegel has been testing the device himself for a year. He tells The WSJ that one of the advantages of Spectacles is not having to hold a smartphone in front of your face because it’s “like a wall.” Re-watching first-person footage is like reliving a memory, Spiegel argues.

He remembers testing a prototype in early 2015 while hiking with his fiancée, supermodel Miranda Kerr. “It was our first vacation, and we went to Big Sur for a day or two. We were walking through the woods, stepping over logs, looking up at the beautiful trees. And when I got the footage back and watched it, I could see my own memory, through my own eyes—it was unbelievable. It’s one thing to see images of an experience you had, but it’s another thing to have an experience of the experience. It was the closest I’d ever come to feeling like I was there again.”

Spiegel refers to Spectacles as a “toy,” and that the best use of it would be to wear it at an outdoor concert or barbecue “for kicks.” The company is taking a slow approach to launch with limited distribution, similar to Google Glass. Spiegel says Snapchat wants to “figure out if it fits into people’s lives and seeing how they like it.” When asked why they made the product and decided to enter the hardware market, Spiegel said “because it’s fun.”

Snapchat has also changed its company name to Snap, Inc as it has expanded its portfolio past its Snapchat app, similar to how Apple changed its name from Apple Computer.

Spiegel thinks of the newly-dubbed Snap, Inc as a camera company rather than a social media company, The WSJ notes. He studied the early histories of Kodak and Polaroid and how they pitched portable cameras to the public. Spectacles gives Snap control of a physical camera, bypassing the smartphone cameras, like that of the iPhone, at the heart of Snapchat thus far. Spiegel hints to The WSJ that there could be “far-reaching implications” if Snap controlled the hardware its users take pictures and video with.

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Snapchat has announced its first hardware product, a one-size-fits-all pair of sunglasses called Spectacles that can record 10 seconds of video at a time, reports The Wall Street Journal. The glasses will cost $130 and launch this fall in three colors: teal, black and coral. Video will sync wirelessly to a paired iPhone or other smartphone.

spectacles

Snap CEO Evan Spiegel in Spectacles, Photo by The WSJ


The glasses record when you tap a button near the hinge, and each tap records 10 seconds of video footage from its 115-degree-angle lens. The lens was designed to be wider than smartphone cameras, more closely mirroring the natural view of human eyes. The video is recorded in a circular format, as Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel argues that the square and rectangle form that photos and videos currently come in are a vestige of early photos being printed on paper.

Snapchat has been developing Spectacles for years, and Spiegel has been testing the device himself for a year. He tells The WSJ that one of the advantages of Spectacles is not having to hold a smartphone in front of your face because it’s “like a wall.” Re-watching first-person footage is like reliving a memory, Spiegel argues.

He remembers testing a prototype in early 2015 while hiking with his fiancée, supermodel Miranda Kerr. “It was our first vacation, and we went to Big Sur for a day or two. We were walking through the woods, stepping over logs, looking up at the beautiful trees. And when I got the footage back and watched it, I could see my own memory, through my own eyes—it was unbelievable. It’s one thing to see images of an experience you had, but it’s another thing to have an experience of the experience. It was the closest I’d ever come to feeling like I was there again.”

Spiegel refers to Spectacles as a “toy,” and that the best use of it would be to wear it at an outdoor concert or barbecue “for kicks.” The company is taking a slow approach to launch with limited distribution, similar to Google Glass. Spiegel says Snapchat wants to “figure out if it fits into people’s lives and seeing how they like it.” When asked why they made the product and decided to enter the hardware market, Spiegel said “because it’s fun.”

Snapchat has also changed its company name to Snap, Inc as it has expanded its portfolio past its Snapchat app, similar to how Apple changed its name from Apple Computer.

Spiegel thinks of the newly-dubbed Snap, Inc as a camera company rather than a social media company, The WSJ notes. He studied the early histories of Kodak and Polaroid and how they pitched portable cameras to the public. Spectacles gives Snap control of a physical camera, bypassing the smartphone cameras, like that of the iPhone, at the heart of Snapchat thus far. Spiegel hints to The WSJ that there could be “far-reaching implications” if Snap controlled the hardware its users take pictures and video with.

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Apple to Offer ‘Spoken Editions’ of Written News on iTunes

Apple is planning on turning news stories and articles from popular news sites into audio podcasts called “Spoken Editions,” reports TechCrunch. Spoken Editions will be short broadcasts that transform content from publishers into spoken word instead of…

Apple is planning on turning news stories and articles from popular news sites into audio podcasts called “Spoken Editions,” reports TechCrunch. Spoken Editions will be short broadcasts that transform content from publishers into spoken word instead of written word, making it possible for customers to listen to their favorite news sites.

An early leak on iTunes suggests Apple has already teamed up with several publishers, including Wired, TIME, and Forbes, offering dedicated “Spoken Edition” sections on company iTunes pages.

spokeneditions

Wired, for example, will launch Spoken Editions for “Business,” “Science,” and its homepage. TIME has will offer a Spoken Edition called “The Brief.” Forbes, .Mic, Bustle, Playboy, OZY, and – yep – TechCrunch (which I discovered while browsing our iTunes page, of all things), will have Spoken Editions, it seems, as all popped up for a time on iTunes.

The links to all the publishers’ Spoken Editions have since been pulled, after our discovery and outreach.

Some digging by TechCrunch suggests many of the publishers’ Spoken Edition podcasts were created by SpokenLayer, a company that creates streaming audio and podcasts for media brands using text. SpokenLayer already works with a host of publishers like Forbes, Huffington Post, TIME, Reuters, and more, with audio recordings distributed on iTunes, SoundCloud, and other sources.

Spoken Editions will include audio ads, with revenue shared between the publisher and SpokenLayer, and the company makes an effort to make sure each brand sounds unique. “We make sure Wired sounds like Wired and any other publication sounds like those publications,” SpokenLayer CEO Will Mayo told TechCrunch.

Spoken Editions are set to launch soon, rolling out in early October.

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Apple Music Chief Eddy Cue Receives $60 Million Stock Award

Apple senior vice president Eddy Cue, who oversees services like the iTunes Store, Apple Music, Apple Pay, Siri, iCloud, and Apple Maps, received nearly $60 million in company stock earlier this week, as scheduled, according to Securities and Exchange Commission documents filed electronically today.

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Specifically, 525,000 of Cue’s restricted stock units converted into common shares on September 21, worth $59.6 million based on AAPL’s closing price of $113.55 on Wednesday. The shares represented the final 75% of 700,000 restricted stock units awarded to Cue in November 2011. The first 25% vested on September 21, 2014.

Cue was originally awarded 100,000 RSUs, but the compensation package became 700,000 RSUs when AAPL split 7-for-1 in June 2014.

256,305 shares were withheld by Apple to satisfy the minimum statutory tax withholding requirements on vesting of RSUs. Cue gifted the remaining 268,695 shares that vested, worth approximately $20.2 million, to a family trust as he did when 350,000 of his RSUs, worth $36.1 million at the time, vested in August 2015.

Cue joined Apple in 1989 and was promoted to Senior Vice President of Internet Software and Services by Apple CEO Tim Cook in September 2011.

Tags: Eddy Cue, RSUs

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Apple senior vice president Eddy Cue, who oversees services like the iTunes Store, Apple Music, Apple Pay, Siri, iCloud, and Apple Maps, received nearly $60 million in company stock earlier this week, as scheduled, according to Securities and Exchange Commission documents filed electronically today.

1.jpg

Specifically, 525,000 of Cue’s restricted stock units converted into common shares on September 21, worth $59.6 million based on AAPL’s closing price of $113.55 on Wednesday. The shares represented the final 75% of 700,000 restricted stock units awarded to Cue in November 2011. The first 25% vested on September 21, 2014.

Cue was originally awarded 100,000 RSUs, but the compensation package became 700,000 RSUs when AAPL split 7-for-1 in June 2014.

256,305 shares were withheld by Apple to satisfy the minimum statutory tax withholding requirements on vesting of RSUs. Cue gifted the remaining 268,695 shares that vested, worth approximately $20.2 million, to a family trust as he did when 350,000 of his RSUs, worth $36.1 million at the time, vested in August 2015.

Cue joined Apple in 1989 and was promoted to Senior Vice President of Internet Software and Services by Apple CEO Tim Cook in September 2011.

Tags: Eddy Cue, RSUs

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