Andrea Cammelleri’s Parking Ticket Tossed Because Of Missing Comma

MIDDLETOWN, Ohio (AP) — An appeals court has agreed with an Ohio woman who said her parking citation should be tossed because the village law was missing a comma.

Andrea Cammelleri (kah-meh-LEHR’-ee) says she shouldn’t have been issued a citation in 2014 based on the wording of the law enacted by the village of West Jefferson.

The law lists several types of vehicles that can’t be parked longer than 24 hours, including a “motor vehicle camper,” with the comma missing between “vehicle” and “camper.”

Cammelleri says her pickup truck did not fit that definition.

The village says the law’s meaning was clear in context, but Judge Robert Hendrickson of the 12th Ohio District Court of Appeals says in last week’s ruling that West Jefferson should amend the law if it wants it read differently.

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Who Says Cats Are Any Different From Dogs?

You know the old cliché about cats and dogs, right? Well, just forget about it.

BuzzFeed is here to prove that your purring felines are just as eager as their barking counterparts to play fetch, devour meals and protect your home. So are cats man’s best friend? Watch the video above and decide for yourself.

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If Mexicans Toasted The 4th Of July The Way Americans Toast Cinco De Mayo

Official beverage of America: Natural Light.

Every year on the 5th of May, Americans consume tacos and tequila in honor of — wait, what is it for? … oh, really? — Mexico’s military victory over France in the Battle of Puebla. If you’re of Mexican descent, you’ve probably grown a little tired of U.S. stereotypes and misinformation about Cinco de Mayo. For the record, Mexico’s Independence Day is actually Sept. 16.

Well, now the poorly researched holiday shoe is on the other foot, so to speak. Check out this Flama original video in which Mexicans celebrate the 4th of July in the same way that Americans celebrate Cinco de Mayo.

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Jon Stewart Slams Donald Trump Supporters For Defending ‘Mexican Rapists’ Comments

Donald Trump has found himself in the center of controversy since he first announced his bid for presidency, and Jon Stewart is having a field day.

On Thursday night’s show, “The Daily Show” host told viewers he wanted to thank one person “who’s been there really throughout this whole run, but specially near the end of the run.” That person was Trump.

“Donald recently glided back into my life on his solid gold up-and-down people mover, cranked up the unauthorized Neil Young, opened up his crazy hole, and promised me I would never be without material again,” Stewart told his viewers.

The focus of Stewart’s segment was a string of anti-immigrant remarks Trump made during his presidential announcement speech. You may remember hearing the Donald say: “They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.”

Like many of us, Stewart was baffled by these comments, but even more so by the people who continued to defend them.

“The one good thing to come out of this is that the farce of his candidacy is finally exposed: his un-seriousness on display, for all people and voters to see! And the results will be obvious,” said Stewart, before showing that Trump is actually in second place among Republican voters in a national poll in three states flashed on screen.

“F–k me,” was all he could say.

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The Great Escape

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Murphy’s Law for Parents of 3-Year-Olds

I am going to take my parenting “expert” hat off and put my mom-of-a-3-year-old hat on. I’ve been feeling under the weather, and although I’m a glass-half-full kind of gal, I started to write these to make myself laugh. I hope you have some chuckles too. And yes, these did actually happen.

Murphy’s Law for Parents of 3-Year-Olds

You will cut the wrong end of the freezie, stir the yogurt the wrong way, break the banana or use the wrong-colored cup.

The day you are late for an important appointment is the day you will unbuckle the car seat, as you always do, and your 3-year-old will shriek like he is being stabbed and refuse to get out.

The timer will beep, reminding you to take your very expensive tenderloin steak off the BBQ, at the same time your 3-year-old yells frantically from the bathroom that he is done pooping and needs your help.

The amount of time your 3-year-old spends on his bike without training wheels is inversely related to how much time it took you to find the tools and get the training wheels off.

The moment you finally sit down at the end of the day, and finally decide on a movie to watch, your 3-year-old will slink into the living room, saying, “I can’t sleep.”

You will cut the grilled cheese sandwich the wrong way. And put the ketchup in the wrong spot.

The morning of the scheduled weekend away BY YOURSELF that you have been waiting for all year, you will discover you have a fever — that your 3-year-old had days before.

The milk will get spilled, so you might as well just leave the paper towel holder on the table.

The words “I want to do it!” go with “Uh-oh.”

The moment you high-five yourself for getting your 3-year-old out the door — dressed, bladder emptied, tummy filled, teeth cleaned, ON TIME — is the moment you realize you didn’t eat breakfast.

You will walk out of the house with your shirt on inside-out. A few times. You may even get to work and realize you still have your pajamas on.

andrea nair

If you take the wagon, he will want to walk. If you don’t take the wagon, he will refuse to walk.

The day your 3-year-old discovers where the scissors are kept is the day you leave your well-thought-out to-do list on the kitchen table.

The night you forget to put the mattress cover on the bed is the night your 3-year-old will pee so fiercely, you’d swear an adult did it.

When you finally feel confident enough to wear more expensive pieces of clothing around the kids, your 3-year-old will manage to get himself some yogurt and want a big hug for his accomplishment.

Your 3-year-old’s favorite pair of shorts — that he must wear every day — will be white. Well, at first, anyway.

The first time you try leaving your child inside while you go out and do some backyard weeding, he will 1) go out the front door, 2) poop on the front lawn and 3) be discovered by your husband, who will just happen to come home early that day.

(By the way, in between fits of laughter, he said, “I love that that happened on your watch!“)

Andrea Nair is on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram.

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Seven Cartoon Characters Who Might be on the Autism Spectrum

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“Mom, I think that person has autism,” says my 10-year-old son Noah. And because his brother Evan is on the spectrum, he has developed an intuitive ability to detect even the most subtle signs of autism.

Sometimes Noah notices an inability to decipher social cues. Sometimes it’s an unusual speech pattern or a repetitive behavior. Once it was something as simple as a mother holding the hand of her young teenage boy.

Noah’s A-dar* got me thinking about which cartoon characters might have an autism diagnosis if such a thing existed in the world of animation. But then, like every responsible attorney, realized I probably should include some sort of disclaimer.

Caution: This post is intended for people who have an appreciation for sarcasm and humor.Yes, I know that autism is a pervasive developmental disorder characterized by deficits in social interaction and communication, a limited range of activities and interests and often the presence of repetitive behaviors. And I know that if a person exhibits one or even some of these traits, it does not necessarily mean he/she has autism. But, for the fun of it, I have diagnosed seven cartoon characters who meet at least one of the criteria for autism. Just remember; sarcasm and humor – or at least one mom’s attempt at it.

1. Cookie Monster Not only does this Sesame Street character exhibit a significant preoccupation with cookies, but his expressive language is significantly delayed when compared to his monster peers. Like many on the spectrum, if he had his way and the writers didn’t cave in to pressures to make him eat healthier, Cookie Monster would happily live on a self-restricted diet consisting of only his preferred food.

2. Schroeder, the object of Lucy’s unrequited affection, is a precocious piano playing prodigy. His savant skills are perfect, and his knowledge of all things Beethoven are nothing less than impressive. Typically, Schroeder is content to play his music and engages in very little on-going dialogue. He can, however, become easily agitated if either his piano playing or his idol Beethoven are criticized.

3. One of the 101 Dalmatians. The prevalence of autism is 1 in 68. Statistically speaking, if you have 101 Dalmatians, chances are at least one of them will fall somewhere on the spectrum.

4. Tigger clearly has issues with attention and focus. With all his bouncing around, we can also speculate that his sensory-seeking behaviors are indicative of an autism diagnosis.

5. Elmer Fudd Forget about the fact that he really needs a good speech pathologist, the guy is obsessed with killing a rabbit. Does he even talk about anything else, ever?

6. Brainy Smurf is a know-it-all intellectual who isn’t afraid to impart his wisdom upon the entire Smurf clan Do they want it? Mostly they don’t, so it’s not unusual for Brainy to be kicked outside the village or smacked over the head with a mallet. Despite the abuse, he remains oblivious to the fact that his fellow Smurfs have no interest in his “wisdom.”

7. SpongeBob wins the award for having the most characteristics of autism. Although hyperactive, he is extremely focused and determined and will do whatever it takes to accomplish a goal. Often, he is oblivious to impending danger, and his lack of awareness tends to put him and others at risk for harm. He has a hard time detecting lies, and his kind-hearted and innocent nature means he is nice to everyone, notably those who are not always kind to him. SpongeBob also has anxiety. He is especially anxious about clowns and the dark.

*A-dar is a made-up term used to refer to someone with an intuitive ability to identify an individual on the autism spectrum.

Which cartoon characters would you add to this list?

This post originally appeared on SpecialEv.com.

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When Mommy Message Board Abbreviations Get Out Of Hand

Parenting message boards can be a great resource, but they can also be a breeding ground for the overuse of abbreviations (aka… abbrevs).

The funny ladies of The BreakWomb show just how alienating this kind of talk can be in their latest video.

The conversation may be filled with “IMHO,” “BF and FF,” NMSAA,” “IDK” and “FIL,” but reminds us that not everyone speaks “Mommy Message Board.”

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