So Zac Efron Doesn’t Actually Hate ‘High School Musical’ After All

In the life cycle of every child star, there comes a moment when they have to distance themselves from the thing that made them famous. Think Hilary Duff and Lizzie McGuire, Miley Cyrus and Hannah Montana or Zac Efron and Troy Bolton, the teen heartthrob of the “High School Musical” franchise. 

“I step back and look at myself and I still want to kick that guy’s ass sometimes,” Zac Efron once said, not mincing words. “He’s done some kind of cool things with some cool people, he did that one thing [‘Neighbors’] that was funny, but I mean he’s still just that fucking kid from [‘High School Musical.’]”

Efron has put a lot of distance between himself and the Disney juggernaut. But it looks like we’ve finally come around to a point where the 28-year-old can appreciate his acting origins. On Friday, Efron shared a photo of himself with “HSM” co-stars Ashley Tisdale, Vanessa Hudgens and Cordin Bleu from 2008.

“So grateful I came across this picture,” he captioned the throwback photo. “With the o.g. crew during one of the most cherished and exciting times of my life. Love you guys forever. #fbf

In January, the cast minus Efron reunited to celebrate the first film’s 10-year anniversary (Yes, we are old AF now). Instead, he submitted a pre-taped message for the fans to compensate for his absence. But they had fun without him anyway. 

I’ll love them forever ❤️❤️❤️

A photo posted by Vanessa Hudgens (@vanessahudgens) on Jan 17, 2016 at 5:43pm PST

10 bucks says they are all LOLing over Efron’s finest onscreen moment. In fact, you can bet on it. 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

In the life cycle of every child star, there comes a moment when they have to distance themselves from the thing that made them famous. Think Hilary Duff and Lizzie McGuire, Miley Cyrus and Hannah Montana or Zac Efron and Troy Bolton, the teen heartthrob of the “High School Musical” franchise. 

“I step back and look at myself and I still want to kick that guy’s ass sometimes,” Zac Efron once said, not mincing words. “He’s done some kind of cool things with some cool people, he did that one thing [‘Neighbors’] that was funny, but I mean he’s still just that fucking kid from [‘High School Musical.’]”

Efron has put a lot of distance between himself and the Disney juggernaut. But it looks like we’ve finally come around to a point where the 28-year-old can appreciate his acting origins. On Friday, Efron shared a photo of himself with “HSM” co-stars Ashley Tisdale, Vanessa Hudgens and Cordin Bleu from 2008.

“So grateful I came across this picture,” he captioned the throwback photo. “With the o.g. crew during one of the most cherished and exciting times of my life. Love you guys forever. #fbf

In January, the cast minus Efron reunited to celebrate the first film’s 10-year anniversary (Yes, we are old AF now). Instead, he submitted a pre-taped message for the fans to compensate for his absence. But they had fun without him anyway. 

I'll love them forever ❤️❤️❤️

A photo posted by Vanessa Hudgens (@vanessahudgens) on

10 bucks says they are all LOLing over Efron’s finest onscreen moment. In fact, you can bet on it. 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Jessica Lange in Long Day’s Journey into Night: “I Like Dark Places”

Movie icon–and lately best known for her role on American Horror Story– Jessica Lange has performed on Broadway only twice before, in two Tennessee Williams masterpieces, The Glass Menagerie and A Streetcar Named Desire, and now she’s in Eugene O’Nei…

Movie icon–and lately best known for her role on American Horror Story– Jessica Lange has performed on Broadway only twice before, in two Tennessee Williams masterpieces, The Glass Menagerie and A Streetcar Named Desire, and now she’s in Eugene O’Neill’s Long Day’s Journey Into Night. As Mary Tyrone, morphine addled matriarch of the Tyrone family, and wife to James Tyrone (Gabriel Byrne), her presence descending the stairs of the family Connecticut home in the 1920’s, illuminated like a specter in the play’s final moments, is unforgettable. Mother to Jamie and Edmund (Michael Shannon and John Gallagher Jr. respectively), she is frail, a wounded bird, and symbol of shattered hope, loss, loneliness, and heartache.

Last week, as the Tony Awards approach, all four actors attended a luncheon at the Lotos Club; this being a state of the art Peggy Siegal event, guests included theater elite including director Pam MacKinnon, and actors F. Murray Abraham and Patrick Kennedy. Long Day’s Journey into Night is nominated for Best Revival with Lange, Byrne, and Shannon listed for best acting honors. But awards were far from the topic of conversation during a panel discussion. Instead, the actors spoke to the depths of character each one had to reach to perform in this play.

Family is at the play’s center: for O’Neill, love itself will not save you from its terrors. Michael Shannon quoted his friend the playwright and actor Tracy Letts: there is so much love in family, but also the desperate need to get away. Gabriel Byrne noted of the drunken characters, “Alcohol is a way to be ruthlessly honest, an excuse to remove the mask.” Brutal and bare as he rues James Tyrone’s missed chances, Byrne said he looks into the black hole of the audience and imagines he sees O’Neill in the fifth row.

A version of this post also appears on Gossip Central.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

INTERVIEW: Kate Beckinsale on <i>Love & Friendship</i>

Kate Beckinsale is a performer who has always ably jumped between such bombastic Hollywood fare as Total Recall and her signature Underworld series, and smaller offerings such as her latest project, Love & Friendship. The film, currently in limited release, reunites Beckinsale with writer-director Whit Stillman, with whom she first worked on 1998’s Last Days of Disco.

Based on Jane Austen’s unfinished novel Lady Susan, Stillman has turned the epistolary prose into a film that not only highlights not only Austen’s particular brand of comedy, but Beckinsale as the conniving “Lady” of the title, Susan Vernon, who is at turns devious and alluring as she manipulates friends, family, and acquaintance alike in her search for physical and material contentment.

It’s a showcase turn for the actress, and it’s clear that the actress had a great experience reuniting not only with her Last Days director, but also with her co-star form that film, Chloë Sevigny, an enthusiasm that was palpable during my conversation with the star during her recent visit to the Bay Area. Read on for some highlights of that chat:

Can you talk about reuniting with Whit after this many years was it something you had been hoping for; was it a pleasant surprise?

Well, Whit sort of went subterranean for a really long period of time so I didn’t really know if that was something to even hope for, to be honest. Whit is a really interesting creature, so he could easily pop up in any other career. I sort of believe Whit can kind of do anything, and wouldn’t be surprised by anything, but it was an extraordinary experience — the first movie we did together was my first American movie that I’d ever done, and it was the first time I’d ever had to do an American accent on film.

And the thing about Whit is that he is sort of Jane Austen in that respect, where he was at that time kind of specializing in a very particularly strata of sort of social milieu, which I was absolutely unfamiliar with; you can imagine coming from England and not having been to America at all, so I felt very unqualified to, you know, when I first got out there I felt like this foreigner who had to really learn about Connecticut and those sort of people and all of that.

And luckily, there was Whit; Chloe was very familiar with all that, so I really was sort of following them around going, “A little help?” and “Who’s this?” and “Who should I listen to, and who’s voice should I copy?” and funny enough Whit said to me yesterday that accent-wise the only problem they had in Last Days of Disco in the end scene between Chloe and I she’d taken on my English accent so they had to redo that, which was very funny.

I didn’t know that until yesterday, which made me laugh. So this time it was a bit different because it was a bit more my territory. I kind of started out doing Jane Austen. Obviously, I’m English so….

There was that.

There was that and it was a little bit easier. You know we had to sort of epistolary relationship at first, the back-and-forth emails. Given that I’m at-base an academic more than anything else, when Whit said I’d like to have your notes on the script, of course I sent back a small thesis, and he’d harass me with these notes for ages and I was feeling like, “Oh god I’ve got to…” ’cause I’d prepared like I’d prepare for anything I was doing at university.

He was like, “Oh, thank you. Can you send some more?” and I sent some more, and then he was like, “Right, I’m getting a bit offended now!” and I was like, “Oh no!” (laughs) So we had a bit of a giggle over that, but he’s amazing because he writes the script and he’s directing, and he’s also got kind of a weird obsession with background actors.

I remember that from Last Days of Disco, where you’d have your most involved scene with your most dialogue and possibly a dance as well, and God knows what going on, and you’d get to the end of it and Whit would be going, “There’s a gardener there, and…” and you’d go, “Well, you’re not looking at all!” But he is, obviously.

This time around I was prepared for it, but the first time I was like, “Oh my goodness, does he hate what I’m doing? He’s looking at the gardener!” it. He’s also got such an amazing gift for what truly is funny, and it might be that the gardener is funnier than you.

Picking up on what you said, this character could very easily have become sinister to the point where the audience turns against her, and I think you manage a very delicate type of walk. What was your process as a performer?

I think the thing that you really don’t want is for it to be arch, and have that kind of mustache twiddling, “I’m a villain” thing. But Whit is so sensitive to nuance. The script that he wrote, I didn’t feel she was like that and I think if your sensibility and the director’s are very similar, it wasn’t something that we were going, “Oh, watch out you’re coming off way too much of a bitch here.”

In fact, his notes were always, “Act a bit less,” or, “Do a bit less.” “Don’t have so much emotion here or there.” They’re pretty much usually that, or something to do with the background. I found it very important to be very aware of the social situation that she was in because this character, who’s an intelligent charismatic woman with a healthy sexual appetite would be doing just fine in 2016. She’d have an extremely high-powered job.

She would have a few lovers and she’d be making her own money and she’d be fine. Trouble is she has all of those qualities and yet she’s in this kind of constrained society where it is sort of impossible to have that kind of a lifestyle unless you’ve secured yourself a husband, and it’s frowned on if you’re not married, and you can’t have multiple lovers and be a serial monogamist or whatever it is.

And yet she has that sensibility so how’s she going to go about that. And I think the way I would most see it is that she’s somebody who very much wants to have her cake and eat it — and does, which is, especially for this period of literature, for a women it’s kind of super unusual. It kind of subverts — what’s supposed to happen if you’ve got multiple lovers and you’re doing all this business that she’s doing you’re supposed to get syphilis and die you know that’s what normally happens or you die in a fire like Dangerous Liaisons, or whatever.

Something terrible happens to you to be a sort of morality tale; Even Mansfield Park, I mean, the adulteress doesn’t do well at the end of that. Whereas she gets every single thing that she wants, and there’s something kind of — you do root for that a bit. There’s a sort of spirit there that even if you didn’t want her in your life, there’s a spirit. (laughs) You kind of cheer a bit. She’s a hundred percent self-serving, and self-justifying. And she’s not insecure at all. There’s something quite nice about…

It’s liberating.

Yeah. Playing and seeing a female who isn’t plagued by any sort of self-doubt whatsoever yet you don’t want her in your family but as a thing, it’s kind of like, “Go you!” And that kind of slightly sociopathic thing of, “This plan has failed. Oh, no worries…”

Plan B!

Yeah, exactly. But in a second. It’s quite heroic. (laughs)

Jane Austen is almost a genre in and of itself, and it’s something that has transcended the period in which it originated. What do you attribute that to? What to you is the appeal of the Jane Austen genre?

I think this is such a different vibe than what we typically associate with Jane Austen. I think she’s obviously the kind of social commentary and the sort of very light, very character-based humor is amazing. She’s also the most brilliant romantic writer.

That whole Mr. Darcy relationship to me forms the kind of template, blueprint, for nearly every romantic comedy there is. It’s like, “Oh, I don’t like him he’s very grumpy and rude…No, no, I’m in love with him.” That’s like every movie, and she’s sort of created that whole thing and that does kind of capture the imagination.

I’m not sure. I think what I was struck by, for example, seeing how many hundred years ago this was written: we had this screening last night, and people were sort of laughing a lot, which was great, but also kind of gasping with a kind of shock at this behavior, and I’m thinking, “That was written in 1794!”

We’re in 2016. We’ve got Internet porn. We can see people f___g animals, and you’re going “(gasp)!” at a Jane Austen pic? I love the fact that we’re in the Castro in San Francisco in 2016, and people are gasping in shock at a Jane Austen heroine. Not much has changed really in that sense of, oh, that human thing.

*******

Many thanks to Kate Beckinsale for her time. Look for Love & Friendship in select theaters now. To hear the audio from this interview, check out the latest episode of the MovieFilm Podcast at this link or via the embed below:

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Kate Beckinsale is a performer who has always ably jumped between such bombastic Hollywood fare as Total Recall and her signature Underworld series, and smaller offerings such as her latest project, Love & Friendship. The film, currently in limited release, reunites Beckinsale with writer-director Whit Stillman, with whom she first worked on 1998’s Last Days of Disco.

Based on Jane Austen’s unfinished novel Lady Susan, Stillman has turned the epistolary prose into a film that not only highlights not only Austen’s particular brand of comedy, but Beckinsale as the conniving “Lady” of the title, Susan Vernon, who is at turns devious and alluring as she manipulates friends, family, and acquaintance alike in her search for physical and material contentment.

It’s a showcase turn for the actress, and it’s clear that the actress had a great experience reuniting not only with her Last Days director, but also with her co-star form that film, Chloë Sevigny, an enthusiasm that was palpable during my conversation with the star during her recent visit to the Bay Area. Read on for some highlights of that chat:

Can you talk about reuniting with Whit after this many years was it something you had been hoping for; was it a pleasant surprise?

Well, Whit sort of went subterranean for a really long period of time so I didn’t really know if that was something to even hope for, to be honest. Whit is a really interesting creature, so he could easily pop up in any other career. I sort of believe Whit can kind of do anything, and wouldn’t be surprised by anything, but it was an extraordinary experience — the first movie we did together was my first American movie that I’d ever done, and it was the first time I’d ever had to do an American accent on film.

And the thing about Whit is that he is sort of Jane Austen in that respect, where he was at that time kind of specializing in a very particularly strata of sort of social milieu, which I was absolutely unfamiliar with; you can imagine coming from England and not having been to America at all, so I felt very unqualified to, you know, when I first got out there I felt like this foreigner who had to really learn about Connecticut and those sort of people and all of that.

And luckily, there was Whit; Chloe was very familiar with all that, so I really was sort of following them around going, “A little help?” and “Who’s this?” and “Who should I listen to, and who’s voice should I copy?” and funny enough Whit said to me yesterday that accent-wise the only problem they had in Last Days of Disco in the end scene between Chloe and I she’d taken on my English accent so they had to redo that, which was very funny.

I didn’t know that until yesterday, which made me laugh. So this time it was a bit different because it was a bit more my territory. I kind of started out doing Jane Austen. Obviously, I’m English so….

There was that.

There was that and it was a little bit easier. You know we had to sort of epistolary relationship at first, the back-and-forth emails. Given that I’m at-base an academic more than anything else, when Whit said I’d like to have your notes on the script, of course I sent back a small thesis, and he’d harass me with these notes for ages and I was feeling like, “Oh god I’ve got to…” ’cause I’d prepared like I’d prepare for anything I was doing at university.

He was like, “Oh, thank you. Can you send some more?” and I sent some more, and then he was like, “Right, I’m getting a bit offended now!” and I was like, “Oh no!” (laughs) So we had a bit of a giggle over that, but he’s amazing because he writes the script and he’s directing, and he’s also got kind of a weird obsession with background actors.

I remember that from Last Days of Disco, where you’d have your most involved scene with your most dialogue and possibly a dance as well, and God knows what going on, and you’d get to the end of it and Whit would be going, “There’s a gardener there, and…” and you’d go, “Well, you’re not looking at all!” But he is, obviously.

This time around I was prepared for it, but the first time I was like, “Oh my goodness, does he hate what I’m doing? He’s looking at the gardener!” it. He’s also got such an amazing gift for what truly is funny, and it might be that the gardener is funnier than you.

Picking up on what you said, this character could very easily have become sinister to the point where the audience turns against her, and I think you manage a very delicate type of walk. What was your process as a performer?

I think the thing that you really don’t want is for it to be arch, and have that kind of mustache twiddling, “I’m a villain” thing. But Whit is so sensitive to nuance. The script that he wrote, I didn’t feel she was like that and I think if your sensibility and the director’s are very similar, it wasn’t something that we were going, “Oh, watch out you’re coming off way too much of a bitch here.”

In fact, his notes were always, “Act a bit less,” or, “Do a bit less.” “Don’t have so much emotion here or there.” They’re pretty much usually that, or something to do with the background. I found it very important to be very aware of the social situation that she was in because this character, who’s an intelligent charismatic woman with a healthy sexual appetite would be doing just fine in 2016. She’d have an extremely high-powered job.

She would have a few lovers and she’d be making her own money and she’d be fine. Trouble is she has all of those qualities and yet she’s in this kind of constrained society where it is sort of impossible to have that kind of a lifestyle unless you’ve secured yourself a husband, and it’s frowned on if you’re not married, and you can’t have multiple lovers and be a serial monogamist or whatever it is.

And yet she has that sensibility so how’s she going to go about that. And I think the way I would most see it is that she’s somebody who very much wants to have her cake and eat it — and does, which is, especially for this period of literature, for a women it’s kind of super unusual. It kind of subverts — what’s supposed to happen if you’ve got multiple lovers and you’re doing all this business that she’s doing you’re supposed to get syphilis and die you know that’s what normally happens or you die in a fire like Dangerous Liaisons, or whatever.

Something terrible happens to you to be a sort of morality tale; Even Mansfield Park, I mean, the adulteress doesn’t do well at the end of that. Whereas she gets every single thing that she wants, and there’s something kind of — you do root for that a bit. There’s a sort of spirit there that even if you didn’t want her in your life, there’s a spirit. (laughs) You kind of cheer a bit. She’s a hundred percent self-serving, and self-justifying. And she’s not insecure at all. There’s something quite nice about…

It’s liberating.

Yeah. Playing and seeing a female who isn’t plagued by any sort of self-doubt whatsoever yet you don’t want her in your family but as a thing, it’s kind of like, “Go you!” And that kind of slightly sociopathic thing of, “This plan has failed. Oh, no worries…”

Plan B!

Yeah, exactly. But in a second. It’s quite heroic. (laughs)

Jane Austen is almost a genre in and of itself, and it’s something that has transcended the period in which it originated. What do you attribute that to? What to you is the appeal of the Jane Austen genre?

I think this is such a different vibe than what we typically associate with Jane Austen. I think she’s obviously the kind of social commentary and the sort of very light, very character-based humor is amazing. She’s also the most brilliant romantic writer.

That whole Mr. Darcy relationship to me forms the kind of template, blueprint, for nearly every romantic comedy there is. It’s like, “Oh, I don’t like him he’s very grumpy and rude…No, no, I’m in love with him.” That’s like every movie, and she’s sort of created that whole thing and that does kind of capture the imagination.

I’m not sure. I think what I was struck by, for example, seeing how many hundred years ago this was written: we had this screening last night, and people were sort of laughing a lot, which was great, but also kind of gasping with a kind of shock at this behavior, and I’m thinking, “That was written in 1794!”

We’re in 2016. We’ve got Internet porn. We can see people f___g animals, and you’re going “(gasp)!” at a Jane Austen pic? I love the fact that we’re in the Castro in San Francisco in 2016, and people are gasping in shock at a Jane Austen heroine. Not much has changed really in that sense of, oh, that human thing.

*******

Many thanks to Kate Beckinsale for her time. Look for Love & Friendship in select theaters now. To hear the audio from this interview, check out the latest episode of the MovieFilm Podcast at this link or via the embed below:


— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Justin Bieber’s Crotch Grab Completes His Transformation Into Marky Mark

Maybe in 20 years’ time, we’ll barely remember Justin Bieber the singer as we toast his soul-baring performance as a down-and-out boxer at the 100th Academy Awards. Hey, if Mark Wahlberg dared to dream… LOL JK COULDN’T EVEN FINISH THAT SENTENCE….

Maybe in 20 years’ time, we’ll barely remember Justin Bieber the singer as we toast his soul-baring performance as a down-and-out boxer at the 100th Academy Awards. Hey, if Mark Wahlberg dared to dream… LOL JK COULDN’T EVEN FINISH THAT SENTENCE. 

Until he’s inducted into the Academy, we’re left with Bieber going full tilt fuccboi, channeling Wahlberg’s permanently shirtless alter ego, Marky Mark, on Instagram. The pop star (and Calvin Klein spokesperson) shared a photo of himself on Friday grabbing his nether regions sans all clothing except underwear.

 [Insert he’s quite a handful joke here]. 

“#mycalvins,” he captioned the photo of himself staring lovingly into the mirror. 

#mycalvins

A photo posted by Justin Bieber (@justinbieber) on

Don’t know how to feel about Bieber self-love? Luckily, award show enemy no. 1 shared a photo before the bulge that more adequately sums up our reaction. 

A photo posted by Justin Bieber (@justinbieber) on

Interest piqued; side-eye achieved. 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

<em>Frozen</em> at Disneyland

photo by BMeyers

Frozen, the highest-grossing animated film of all time, is certainly destined to become a successful and long-running stage musical. In the meantime, an abbreviated stage version of the film had its world premiere this week at the H…

2016-05-28-1464461671-467266-PR2_5697.jpg
photo by BMeyers

Frozen, the highest-grossing animated film of all time, is certainly destined to become a successful and long-running stage musical. In the meantime, an abbreviated stage version of the film had its world premiere this week at the Hyperion Theater at California Adventure. This adaptation, which was directed by Tony-nominated director Liesl Tommy, is tailored more for Disneyland visitors than for Broadway audiences, and is a separate endeavor from the stage version in development for a pre-Broadway engagement in 2017.

This production, which is trimmed to a little over an hour, hits the high points of the film, including the popular musical numbers “Let It Go”, “For the First Time in Forever” and “Do You Want to Build a Snowman.” For those few who are unfamiliar with the film, the show offers enough to grasp the gist of the story, while for diehard fans it delivers the stirring high points
.
The story begins with some stiff and awkward expository scenes, but does get roiling with a bit of humor provided by the clumsy sister Anna,charmingly played on premiere night by an non-credited actress (Disney did not provide names or other information about cast members). The evening hits its stride as Elsa sings “Let It Go” (again, a powerful vocal rendition by an unnamed actress), and director Tommy begins to pull out all the technological bells and whistles of current Broadway stagecraft, with a hefty dose of Las Vegas thrown in. While the expensive and dazzling technical elements are impressive, they are not particularly innovative – most are now familiar in the top-drawer commercial productions.

For the most part, Tommy steers a cautious course – staying faithful to the spirit of the film and serving up crowd-pleasing scenes for fans. Despite the expensive special effects, the opening night was marred by frequent low-tech glitches, primarily problems with the performers’ mikes which occasionally cut out and with a couple of awkward changes of scenery. However, most of these problems will certainly be ironed out as the production gets its legs.

While the acting was solid if not inspiring, the real disappointment was the choreography by Christophe Windom, which showed little originality and felt entirely cookie cutter. Costumes by Clint Ramos were amusing and inventive and video/projection designs by Aaron Rhyme were impressive. That said, the show will certainly provide happiness to the thousands of Frozen fans who will enjoy this production at Disneyland, and will do nothing to slow this latest Disney juggernaut.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Court Documents Detail Johnny Depp’s Alleged Abuse Against Amber Heard

New details alleging domestic abuse have emerged from court documents Amber Heard filed in her application for divorce from Johnny Depp.
The claims surfaced after a Los Angeles judge granted Heard a temporary restraining order on Friday…

New details alleging domestic abuse have emerged from court documents Amber Heard filed in her application for divorce from Johnny Depp.

The claims surfaced after a Los Angeles judge granted Heard a temporary restraining order on Friday, after the actress accused Depp of physically abusing her on more than one occasion. 

Two days before Heard filed for divorce, she alleges Depp hit her in the face with a cellphone, pulled her hair and verbally accosted her, according to the court filings media outlets including The Los Angeles Times and People obtained.

“During the entirety of our relationship, Johnny Depp has been verbally and physically abusive to me,” Heard states in a sworn declaration. “He has a short fuse. He is often paranoid and his temper is exceptionally scary for me.”

Heard submitted photographic evidence to support her abuse allegations to the court on Friday morning, as she applied for a restraining order from the “Pirates of the Caribbean” actor. Depp’s attorney, Laura Wasser, filed a response accusing Heard of falsifying abuse claims to “secure a premature financial resolution.”

Both Heard and Depp’s representatives did not immediately respond to requests for comment. 

The court documents detail an altercation between Heard and Depp on Saturday, May 21. Heard claims that she was with friends in the couple’s Los Angeles apartment when Depp returned “inebriated and high.”

She said in the evidence submitted that they were discussing the recent death of his mother, when Depp “began obsessing about something that was untrue” and violently lashed out at her, demanding that she phone a friend to validate his accusations. 

“Johnny ripped the cell phone from my hand and began screaming profanities and insults at iO [the friend],” she said, according to the court documents. “I heard iO yell at me to get out of the house. Johnny then grabbed the cellphone, wound up his arm like a baseball pitcher and threw the cellphone at me striking my cheek and eye with great force.”

It is unclear from the court documents where her friends present earlier were during the altercation, but Heard said the incident ended when a neighbor she texted arrived. She alleges that Depp then smashed her belongings before leaving the apartment. 

Heard also accuses Depp of assaulting her on her 30th birthday party in April 2015, after which the two led separate lives for a month. 

The LAPD arrived at the apartment on May 21, but the “party didn’t want to provide information or make a crime report,” NBC News reports, citing a police department spokesperson.

There is currently no criminal investigation into Heard’s allegations of abuse, the spokesperson added, according to NBC News. 

Depp is currently performing with his band the Hollywood Vampires in Portugal at the Rock in Rio Lisboa music festival. The date of the next hearing is June 17, at which time Heard’s restraining order against him will expire. 

 

Need help? In the U.S., call 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) for the National Domestic Violence Hotline or visit the National Sexual Assault Online Hotline operated by RAINN. For more resources, visit the National Sexual Violence Resource Center’s website.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Jessica Lange And ‘American Horror Story’ Are Never Getting Back Together

Grab your “American Horror Story” DVDs, a tub of ice cream and brace yourself.
After putting up with a murder house, asylum, witches’ coven and freak show, Jessica Lange checked out of the “American Horror Story” franchise in 201…

Grab your “American Horror Story” DVDs, a tub of ice cream and brace yourself.

After putting up with a murder house, asylum, witches’ coven and freak show, Jessica Lange checked out of the “American Horror Story” franchise in 2015. And now she’s officially never coming back. 

Lange left Ryan Murphy’s horror anthology series after the fourth installment, in which she played the owner of one of the last remaining freak shows. Her character, Elsa Mars, was a former German fetish film star whose legs had been amputated with a chainsaw (did a shark just jump across your screen?) so it was probably a good time to bid adieu.

Lady Gaga admirably filled the Lange-sized hole in the following season, earning her a Golden Globe for her performance, but if we’re being honest, no one does a monologue like Lange. 

During a recent interview with Charlie Rose, the Oscar winner confirmed that “Freak Show” was indeed her last ride on the “AHS” carousel, explaining that after four seasons, it felt like right time to take her final bow. 

“No, I had four years with that, four seasons, and each year was a marvelous character,” she said. “Everything changed from one year to another which made it very interesting to me. But no, I think sometimes you come to the end of something and it has had its natural–”

Rose, apparently an “AHS” fanboy at heart, cut in, “But, I mean, people loved you in that.” 

To which Lange responded, “I know, I know, it’s funny.”

Lange and Murphy, however, will collaborate again for the new anthology series “Feud,” which takes its name from the infamous rivalry between Bette Davis and Joan Crawford on the set of 1962’s “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?” 

When Lange closes a door, she opens a window. 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Trump: A Star Is Scorned

It started with dog feces. One day, someone took a service animal to the iconic Hollywood Walk of Fame and the dog did its business right on Donald Trump’s star. Then the picture went onto Twitter.
  — This feed and its contents are the pro…

It started with dog feces. One day, someone took a service animal to the iconic Hollywood Walk of Fame and the dog did its business right on Donald Trump’s star. Then the picture went onto Twitter.

 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.