Apple Announces LivePhotosKit API for Embedding Live Photos in Websites

Apple today announced the launch of a new LivePhotosKit JavaScript-based API that’s designed to make it easy to embed Live Photos taken with Apple’s latest iPhones into websites.

This new JavaScript-based API makes it easy to embed Live Photos on your websites. In addition to enabling Live Photos on iOS and macOS, you can now let users display their Live Photos on the web.

Introduced alongside the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus in 2015, Live Photos are designed to add life and vitality to the standard still photo by adding a bit of motion. A Live Photo captures an extra 1.5 seconds of movement before and after a shot, animating an image with movement and sound.

Live Photos can be captured using the iPhone 6s, 6s Plus, SE, 7, and 7 Plus, and can be viewed on all devices running iOS 9, OS X El Capitan, and watchOS 2 or later.

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Though Live Photos have been around since 2015, few social networks support them, and there have been limited ways for non-Apple users to view them. The addition of a LivePhotosKit API may help make Live Photos more popular.
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Apple’s Tree Buying Spree for Apple Park Causing Shortages

Apple is purchasing so many trees for its upcoming Apple Park campus that it’s becoming challenging for other companies to source trees, according to a report from the San Francisco Chronicle.

“Buying trees is a surprisingly cutthroat business,” reads the Chronicle in a piece about a rooftop City Park that’s being built above the upcoming Transbay Transit Center in San Francisco. Adam Greenspan and Patrick Trollip, who are sourcing trees for that project, say Apple has made it hard to track down trees across California and Oregon.

And it’s been especially challenging to locate desirable specimens because Apple has been buying up 3,000 trees for its new Cupertino headquarters. When Greenspan and Trollip found a tree they fancied they would “tag it” with a locking yellow tag, so that nobody else — like Apple — could get it. Eventually all the tagged trees were moved to a nursery in Sunol, where the transbay project team leased 4 acres.

Apple Park, Apple’s second campus with the famous spaceship-shaped main building, will be completely covered in greenery. Landscaping at the site started late last year, and Apple has said it will plant more than 9,000 native and drought-resistant trees, including fruit trees.

In a separate report on Apple Park, The Economist highlighted the parking situation at the campus. For the 14,000 workers that Apple plans to have on site, Apple has built nearly 11,000 parking spaces, many of them located in underground lots beneath the main building and in two garages at the south of the campus.

In total, Apple has built 325,000 square meters of parking, compared to 318,000 square meters of offices and research buildings. So much space has been dedicated to parking due to Cupertino city laws, which require a certain number of parking spaces for employees.

Employees will begin moving into Apple Park in April, but Apple has said it will take more than six months to transition thousands of employees to the site. Smaller building construction and landscaping has not been finished and will continue into the summer, even after the campus sees its grand opening.
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Apple Says It Has No Plans for ARM-Based or Touchscreen Macs

Apple recently invited a small group of reporters to Cupertino for a roundtable discussion about the Mac, and while the conversation was primarily focused on the Mac Pro, Apple also revealed that it has no plans for Macs with touchscreens or Macs powered solely by ARM chips, rather than Intel processors, per Axios.

The company has no plans for touchscreen Macs, or for machines powered solely by the kind of ARM processors used in the iPhone and iPad. However, executives left open the possibility ARM chips could play a broader role as companion processors, something that showed up first with the T1 processor that powers the Touch Bar in the new MacBook Pro.

Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller aptly said “no” when asked about the prospect of touchscreen Macs, according to TechCrunch.

It’s worth noting that, when asked about a touch display here, in the context of efforts like Microsoft’s Surface Studio, Schiller replies “No.”

“That’s a whole other long discussion we can get into, but suffice it to say, it’s not a big need of the Mac Pro customers that we’re trying to address,” he says. “You mentioned again how we’re talking about both the iMac and MacBook — I do think that we have a two-prong desktop strategy with both iMac and Mac Pro, we think are each going to be important for pro desktops.”

It’s not the first time that Schiller or Apple have dismissed the idea of a touchscreen Mac. In November, he said that Apple has tested a touchscreen Mac and “absolutely come away with the belief that it isn’t the right thing to do.” He even went as far as calling the idea of a touchscreen iMac “absurd.”

“Can you imagine a 27-inch iMac where you have to reach over the air to try to touch and do things? That becomes absurd.” He also explains that such a move would mean totally redesigning the menu bar for fingers, in a way that would ruin the experience for those using pointer devices like the touch or mouse. “You can’t optimize for both,” he says. “It’s the lowest common denominator thinking.”

Apple design chief Jony Ive has likewise said that a touchscreen Mac would “not be a particularly useful or appropriate application of Multi-Touch.”



For now, it appears the closest we will get to a touchscreen or ARM-based Mac is the latest MacBook Pro, which has a Touch Bar powered by an ARM-based T1 chip as a companion processor. Apple has said one thing and later reversed course in the past, however, so the company’s roadmap could change in the future.
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The Morning After: Wednesday, April 5th 2017

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