Throwboy Launches New Line of Pillows Designed to Look Like Apple Devices

If you’ve ever wanted to snuggle with your Apple devices, Throwboy has a new Kickstarter project that may be of interest. The new Iconic Pillow Collection includes a selection of plushy pillows that have been designed to look like Apple products.

The collection includes five pillows meant to mimic the Apple II, released in 1977; the first Macintosh, released in 1984; the iMac G3, which was released in 1998 and also happens to be celebrating its 20th anniversary today; the iPod, released in 2001; and the iPhone, released in 2007.



Each of the five pillows features embroidery and design details to make it look like the product it’s designed after. The 1984 pillow, for example, has a rainbow logo (not an Apple logo, for trademark reasons), a floppy disk drive, and vents at the sides.



The 2001 iPod pillow features the iPod’s two-toned body, a click wheel, and a screen, while the iPhone includes a Home button, speaker, and the silver and black color scheme from the original device.



According to Throwboy, all of its pillows are made from ultra-soft 100 percent vegan fine grain plush, with careful embroidery, woven and silk screen labels, and a poly fiber filling. Each pillow measures approximately 13 x 5 x 13 inches and weighs just about a pound.

The first backers can get a single Iconic Pillow of their choice for $27, after which prices will go up to $33. Pricing on two pillows starts at $54 for early backers, while all five can be purchased by the first backers for $135.



Specific pricing for each tier is available on the Kickstarter project site, and pricing will vary after early bird rewards run out.



Throwboy plans to begin shipping the first of the pillows out in January 2019. While Kickstarter project shipping dates are often delayed, Throwboy is an established company that’s been making quirky pillows for a decade, so it’s likely that’s a reasonable shipping timeline.
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Apple Hosts Nobel Prize Laureate Malala Yousafzai for Talk at Apple Park

Apple today held an event at its Apple Park campus where Apple CEO Tim Cook and Lisa Jackson, Apple Vice President of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives, interviewed and honored Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Malala Yousafzai, who spoke to hundreds of young people about her work with the Malala Fund.



Apple in January announced a partnership with Yousafzai’s Malala Fund, which advocates for quality education and equal opportunity for girls around the world.

Through support with Apple, the Malala Fund has said it expects to double the number of grants awarded by its Gulmakai Network and extend funding programs to India and Latin America with the initial goal of providing secondary education opportunities to more than 100,000 girls.

The Malala Fund is also working with Apple’s Developer Academies in Brazil, providing Apple Developer Academy students and alumni in brazil with the opportunity to esign and develop apps aimed at furthering the Fund’s goals.

Apple is helping the Malala Fund scale its organization by assisting with technology, curriculum and research into policy changes needed to help girls everywhere attend school and complete their education.

At the time Apple announced the partnership, Apple CEO Tim Cook joined the Malala Fund leadership council.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.
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Apple Confirms Infowars App Won’t Be Removed From App Store

Apple does not plan to remove the Infowars app from the iOS App Store at this time, the company told BuzzFeed News this evening. Apple said that the Infowars app had not violated its App Store guidelines.

“We strongly support all points of view being represented on the App Store, as long as the apps are respectful to users with differing opinions, and follow our clear guidelines, ensuring the App Store is a safe marketplace for all,” the company said in a statement.

“We continue to monitor apps for violations of our guidelines and if we find content that violates our guidelines and is harmful to users we will remove those apps from the store as we have done previously.”

Apple over the weekend removed the entire libraries of five Infowars podcasts from the Apple Podcasts platform. “War Room” and “The Alex Jones Show,” hosted by controversial U.S. radio show host and conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, were among those pulled from Apple Podcasts.

When removing the Infowars podcast listings from the Podcasts platform, Apple said that it does not tolerate hate speech, finding that the Infowars podcasts did indeed violate its podcast content guidelines.

“Apple does not tolerate hate speech, and we have clear guidelines that creators and developers must follow to ensure we provide a safe environment for all of our users,” a company spokesperson said.

“Podcasts that violate these guidelines are removed from our directory making them no longer searchable or available for download or streaming. We believe in representing a wide range of views, so long as people are respectful to those with differing opinions.”

As BuzzFeed points out, the Infowars mobile app available from the App Store allows users to live stream the same programs that were removed from the Apple Podcasts platform. The Infowars mobile app streams video broadcasts rather than making a repository of content available to listeners, however, which may be why the app was not pulled while the podcasts were.

BuzzFeed suggests that since the streaming broadcasts are ephemeral and not stored in the app, that Apple will need to “catch [Jones] in the act and in the moment” to act on a violation.

Apple’s App Store guidelines state that apps should not include content that is offensive, insensitive, upsetting, intended to disgust, or in exceptionally poor taste. Defamatory, discriminatory, or mean-spirited content is listed as an example.

Defamatory, discriminatory, or mean-spirited content, including references or commentary about religion, race, sexual orientation, gender, national/ethnic origin, or other targeted groups, particularly if the app is likely to humiliate, intimidate, or place a targeted individual or group in harm’s way.

Multiple social media platforms have now removed Infowars content from their services, including YouTube, Facebook, and Spotify.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.
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Apple’s iOS ‘Health Records’ Feature Now Works With 75+ Providers

Apple’s Health Records feature, introduced in iOS 11.3, now allows iOS users to access their medical records from more than 75 different hospitals and medical providers in the United States.

Apple maintains a list of all of the healthcare institutions that support Health Records on the iPhone, which as VentureBeat points out, was updated in August ahead of a talk from Apple’s Clinical and Health Informatics lead Ricky Bloomfield, M.D. given at the ONC 2nd Interoperability Forum (via EHR Intelligence).



When the Health Records feature first launched earlier this year, it worked with just 12 healthcare providers, a number that Apple has been working to improve. Recent additions include Kaiser in Oregon and Washington, Baptist Health, Buffalo Health, Greater Hudson Valley Health System, UC San Diego Health, UCLA Health, and others.

Health record data is available in the Health app, and allows patients who have multiple healthcare providers to access all of their information in one convenient place.

According to Bloomfield, Apple’s Health app leverages Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) that were developed to facilitate better data sharing standards. FHIR is in a draft stage and won’t be finalized until the end of the year, but Apple’s adoption may drive widespread adoption of FHIR in the medical community.

Apple is using an “Argonaut” implementation of the Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources standard, in fact, because it’s simple and will encourage medical providers to adopt it.

The Health Records feature in the Health app is designed to connect with partner systems using FHIR to collect data and display it right on a user’s device.

“It makes it very easy for you to manage your health information,” Bloomfield told attendees of the ONC 2nd Interoperability Forum on August 8. “You as a user have complete control over who has access to the data. If you don’t want to share it, it won’t be shared. It stays private on your device until you decide to share it.”

As Bloomfield explains, Health Records can be accessed in the Health app under the “Health Data” section. After choosing and authenticating with a provider, all relevant medical data is available through the Health app and is updated automatically following doctor visits.

“That significantly reduces the friction typically associated with accessing your health information where you need to remember your credentials, log in, and then get the information,” he continued. “And when you have new information, you may get an email that there’s new information, but you still need to log in to access the information.”

Health Records is designed to display information that includes allergies, vital signs, conditions, immunizations, medications, labs, and procedures.

As with all Apple features, privacy is a key with Health Records. As Bloomfield says, patients have control over who is able to access their data.
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Google Assistant’s visual smart home controls are on the way

You don't have to pick up a smart display to use touch-savvy controls in Google Assistant. Users at Droid Life and elsewhere have noticed that Google is rolling out visual smart home controls (teased back at I/O in May) to mobile devices. When you…

Snapchat update leaked some of its iOS app’s source code

Snap's user losses aren't the only things the company has had to worry about as of late. A spokesperson has confirmed to Motherboard that a May update for the Snapchat iOS app exposed a "small amount" of its source code, and that someone posted that…

How to Access and Set Up Parental Controls in iOS 12

With Screen Time, Apple has introduced a robust set of parental control options in iOS 12, giving parents a way to monitor and limit the amount of time children are spending on their iOS devices, within specific apps, and more.

Screen Time works via Family Sharing, so as long as your children are part of your Family in the Family Sharing settings, you’ll be able to view and control their Screen Time options.

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Turning Screen Time On

You’ll need to turn on and set up Screen Time on all devices owned and used by your children, which is done in the Screen Time section of the Settings app.



Here’s how to do it:

  1. Open up the Settings app.
  2. Navigate to the Screen Time section.”
  3. Choose “Turn on Screen Time.”
  4. When you see the introductory screen asking whether this is your iPhone or your child’s iPhone, select “This is My Child’s iPhone.”

From here, you can choose to set Downtime, which is a set period of time in which your child will be allowed or disallowed from using the iPhone, or App Limits, which will restrict certain app categories. At setup, you can also choose Content and Privacy settings, which are further explained below.

If you want to change Downtime and App Limits selections for your child, you will be able to do so at any time by going to the Settings app and selecting Screen Time on the child’s device.

A child’s Screen Time settings are also accessible on the parent’s device for making changes remotely, available by tapping on a child’s name in the Screen Time section of the Settings app, listed under the parent’s own Screen Time usage.

All of your App Limits, Downtime, and Content Restrictions are protected via a passcode that must be entered to grant more usage time to children when limits have been reached. This also prevents children from changing their own Screen Time settings.


Using Downtime

Downtime sets a schedule that allows you to choose when your child can and cannot use their iPhone or iPad. You can, for example, choose to restrict access to iOS devices from 10:00 p.m. at bedtime until 7:00 a.m. in the morning, or choose something that limits hours even further, such as during school.



With Downtime, you can opt to block the device at Downtime, which prevents apps from being used entirely sans parental permission or choose for a less restrictive feature that allows children to turn off Downtime themselves or get 15 more minutes of usage before another reminder about Downtime restrictions.

Downtime and App Limits with blocking turned on at left and blocking turned off at right


Most parents will likely want to turn on blocking for Downtime to prevent apps from being used entirely, but the non-blocking option is useful for more responsible children where all parents want to do is offer up a reminder that apps shouldn’t be used at certain times.

During Downtime, all apps on the iPhone are grayed out with little hourglass locks on them, letting children know that time limits have been reached. The exception is certain apps that are always allowed in case of emergency, such as the phone.

Using App Limits

App Limits allow you to finely control how much time your kids spend using certain categories of apps.

With App Limits, you can set restrictions on All Apps & Categories, Social Networking, Games, Entertainment, Creativity, Productivity, Education, Reading & Reference, Health & Fitness, and Other.



So, for example, if you want to limit the amount of time a child is spending on Snapchat and mobile games, you can set an App Limit for those categories for an hour or two.

After the App Limit has been reached, children won’t be able to further access those app categories without asking for express parental permission. Apps will be locked with an hourglass symbol and a passcode will be required to enable more time.

As with Downtime, you can set less restrictive rules that serve as more of a reminder by turning off blocking with App Limits.

Always Allowed Apps

With Downtime and App Limits, you can set certain apps to “Always Allowed” to let children access them at all times even when Downtime and App Limits are enabled.

By default, Apple marks Phone, Messages, FaceTime, and Maps as always available apps, but you can select any apps that you want through the Always Allowed app interface, accessible under “Always Allowed” in the Screen Time section of Settings on a child’s device.



You can also remove access to all apps, including Messages, with the exception of the phone, which remains available to children in case of emergency.

Always Allowed is ideal if you want your kids to be able to use certain educational or communication apps at anytime while leaving other apps inaccessible.

Selecting Content Restrictions

Apple has always offered Content Restrictions for parents to limit access to music, movies, TV shows, and apps that are inappropriate for younger children, but these parental controls now live under the Screen Time section of the Settings app alongside the other Screen Time options.



In the Content & Privacy Restrictions section of Screen Time on a child’s device, you can do things like limit App Store purchases, prevent kids from deleting apps, disallow access to certain apps, and set age restrictions on entertainment content.

You can also set privacy settings for everything from location to advertising preferences, so, for example, if you wanted to make sure you can always access your child’s location, you can turn on Location Services and select Share My Location.



There are even options that prevent children from changing the passcode on their device, restrict account changes, limit volume, and automatically turn on Do Not Disturb While Driving.

Accessing Content & Privacy restrictions requires an adult to input a Content & Privacy passcode, which prevents children from changing these settings.
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Google plans to roll out digital wellness features in Pie but Apple’s already got ’em

Google hopes to add a few digital wellness features to its latest desserted update, Pie (out today) but Apple is already on this health track with its latest update for iOS 12.

Digital wellness allows users to keep track of time spent on and unplug from your digital device when needed. Google announced the new wellness features coming to Android at I/O in May, including a dashboard for digital wellness, or the ability to track just how much time you spend on your device, an app timer that lets you set time limits on apps, a new Do Not Disturb feature which silences pop-up notifications and Wind Down, a feature to help you switch on Night Light and Do Not Disturb when it’s time to hit the hay.

Apple is also making digital wellness a focus. New features in this space were announced during its WWDC conference earlier this summer and the company has included an updated ‘Do Not Disturb’ feature in the iOS 12 update, also out today.

Several studies have suggested the importance of unplugging and breaking our addictions to our smartphones for our sanity’s sake and it seems Google would like to help us do just that with these new features. However, the new digital wellness features aren’t quite available in the latest Pie update, out today. We’ve asked Google why not and will update you when and if we hear back on that.

Meanwhile, Apple continues to roll ahead, adding its own controls to help iPhone owners curb their app and screen time usage. Similar to Android’s future offerings, iOS 12 includes a dash with a weekly report on how you spend time on your device. A feature called Downtime helps you schedule time away from your screen (versus just leaving your phone somewhere, seeing a notification and being tempted to pick it up), a feature to set time limits on apps and a way to block inappropriate content from reaching your screen as well.

Apple beats Android in this department for now but those features will supposedly be made available to everyone with a Google phone eventually. For those wanting to check out the new digital wellness features for Android, you can still do that today but only if you happen to have a Google Pixel — and only if you’ve signed up for the beta version.