Filmmakers in ‘Noah’ Used an iPad to Control a Huge Overhead Lighting and Rain System [iOS Blog]

The special effects crew behind the new Biblical epic Noah used a custom iPad app to control a huge overhead artificial rain and lighting rig that was capable of pouring 5,000 gallons per minute of water and turning night into day.

WIRED went behind the scenes to see how the FX team put it all together.

And on the eighth day, we got apps. Director Darren Aronofsky’s new film Noah is, of course, about the Biblical flood so massive it required one man to build an ark. Bringing such an apocalyptic deluge to the big screen was no easy task, and it required the special effects team behind the movie to, well, make it rain.

    




Roku CEO Calls Apple TV a ‘Money Loser’, Says Product is ‘Essentially’ an Accessory for iPad

Speaking at the inaugural Code/Media event held by technology website Re/code (via CNET), Roku CEO and founder Anthony Wood called the Apple TV “a money loser” for Apple, likening the product to an accessory for the iPad and questioning why Apple would want to sell more units of the device. Wood’s remarks come as Apple is said to be preparing a new version of the Apple TV that will integrate with Comcast’s network to enable a streaming TV service for users.

“Apple TV is essentially an accessory for the iPad. They lose money, which is unusual for Apple,” he said Thursday, speaking at the Recode conference here. “If you’re losing money, why would you want to sell more?”

apple_tv_roku_3
Wood also commented on Amazon’s upcoming set-top box debuting next month, as well as overall competition in the set-top media box market:

“Every year about this time, the Amazon box comes up that they’re about to launch. And the new Apple TV is about to launch … We’ve been competing with Apple TV for six years now, and every year, we’ve grown,” Wood told Kafka. ”We’re in the TV platform business. Our goal is to be the operating system for TV.”

The CEO also went on to tell the crowd that sales of the Roku doubled after Apple dropped the price of the Apple TV from $249 to $99 two years ago. Wood’s comments are notable given that the Apple TV reportedly generated $1 billion last year, which was revealed by Apple CEO Tim Cook during the company’s 2014 shareholder’s meeting.

Roku refreshed its set-top box line with three new models joining its flagship Roku 3 last September, and also introduced a $50 HDMI streaming-stick to compete directly with Google’s Chromecast and the Apple TV. Despite the Apple TV’s growing popularity, however, a report last August from Parks Associates indicated that the Roku has proven to be more popular than Apple’s set top box, as 14% of U.S. broadband households were said to be using streaming media boxes.

Apple is expected to launch a new Apple TV sometime in the near future, with some rumors pointed to a refined set-top box that may include gaming and cable box-like capabilities in addition to the aforementioned streaming TV integration.

A report from The Information also added details to the forthcoming device, claiming that it will feature a dramatically overhauled interface, which will blend TV listings with apps and video from the web, with Apple asking iOS game developers to make their titles compatible with its new product so that users can play games on their TV using iOS devices as controllers.

    






iPad Writes a New Game Plan for Concussions

To help diagnose sports-related concussions, Cleveland Clinic in Ohio is using an iPad app that can measure and monitor symptoms moments after an athlete gets hurt. With iPad and the C3 Logix app, trainers can visualize an injury’s effect on cognitive and motor performance, making it easier to spot a concussion. “In the past, evaluating a concussed athlete involved a lot of guesswork,” says athletic trainer Jason Cruickshank, whose team is part of a program using this new technology. “iPad and the C3 Logix app have taken that subjectivity out of the process.” And injury assessments that previously required several pieces of equipment have now become simpler. “We needed an acceleromater, a gyroscope, and a great display to be able to objectively test balance, vision, and reaction time,” Cruickshank says. “iPad gave us all of that in a single device.”